The accessibility of spatial channels for stereo and motion

This source preferred by Changhong Liu

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hess, R.F., Wang, Y.-Z. and Liu, C.H.

Journal: Vision Res

Volume: 46

Issue: 8-9

Pages: 1318-1326

ISSN: 0042-6989

DOI: 10.1016/j.visres.2005.10.029

Using fractal noise images, we measured the dependence of D(min) on the spatial passband (spatial frequency and orientation) over which information was correlated either between the eyes for stereo or between sequential frames for motion. Without affecting the amplitude spectrum of the noise stimulus we used idealized filters to scramble the phase of components outside a pre-defined passband. Using a simple Gaussian model in which performance depends on the signal/noise within a restricted spatial region, we obtained estimates of the bandwidth of the narrowest underlying spatial frequency and orientation spectral region subserving these two comparable tasks. Spatial bandwidths varied with peak spatial frequency but were very broad approximating the spectrum of the stimulus itself. Orientation properties of the underlying mechanisms were isotropic. These results suggest that the independent activity of individual narrowband spatial channels is not perceptually accessible for these tasks.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hess, R.F., Wang, Y.Z. and Liu, C.H.

Journal: Vision Research

Volume: 46

Issue: 8-9

Pages: 1318-1326

ISSN: 0042-6989

DOI: 10.1016/j.visres.2005.10.029

Using fractal noise images, we measured the dependence of Dminon the spatial passband (spatial frequency and orientation) over which information was correlated either between the eyes for stereo or between sequential frames for motion. Without affecting the amplitude spectrum of the noise stimulus we used idealized filters to scramble the phase of components outside a pre-defined passband. Using a simple Gaussian model in which performance depends on the signal/noise within a restricted spatial region, we obtained estimates of the bandwidth of the narrowest underlying spatial frequency and orientation spectral region subserving these two comparable tasks. Spatial bandwidths varied with peak spatial frequency but were very broad approximating the spectrum of the stimulus itself. Orientation properties of the underlying mechanisms were isotropic. These results suggest that the independent activity of individual narrowband spatial channels is not perceptually accessible for these tasks.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Hess, R.F., Wang, Y.Z. and Liu, C.H.

Journal: VISION RESEARCH

Volume: 46

Issue: 8-9

Pages: 1318-1326

ISSN: 0042-6989

DOI: 10.1016/j.visres.2005.10.029

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Hess, R.F., Wang, Y.Z. and Liu, C.H.

Journal: Vision research

Volume: 46

Issue: 8-9

Pages: 1318-1326

eISSN: 1878-5646

ISSN: 0042-6989

Using fractal noise images, we measured the dependence of D(min) on the spatial passband (spatial frequency and orientation) over which information was correlated either between the eyes for stereo or between sequential frames for motion. Without affecting the amplitude spectrum of the noise stimulus we used idealized filters to scramble the phase of components outside a pre-defined passband. Using a simple Gaussian model in which performance depends on the signal/noise within a restricted spatial region, we obtained estimates of the bandwidth of the narrowest underlying spatial frequency and orientation spectral region subserving these two comparable tasks. Spatial bandwidths varied with peak spatial frequency but were very broad approximating the spectrum of the stimulus itself. Orientation properties of the underlying mechanisms were isotropic. These results suggest that the independent activity of individual narrowband spatial channels is not perceptually accessible for these tasks.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:51 on December 12, 2018.