Recognizing faces defined by texture gradients

This source preferred by Changhong Liu

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Liu, C.H., Collin, C.A., Farivar, R. and Chaudhuri, A.

Journal: Percept Psychophys

Volume: 67

Issue: 1

Pages: 158-167

ISSN: 0031-5117

Texture gradients can reveal surface orientation in a manner similar to shape from shading, and therefore provide an important cue for object recognition. In this study, we tested whether a complex 3-D object, such as a face, can be identified from texture gradients alone. The stimuli were laser-scanned faces for which the texture element was a fractal-noise pattern mapped onto the 3-D surface. An eight-alternative forced choice task was used in which participants matched a face defined by texture gradients to one of eight faces defined by shape from shading (Experiment 1) or by texture gradients (Experiment 2). On average, participants scored 24% and 18%, respectively, above chance in these experiments. Although this performance was much poorer than the performance based entirely on shape-from-shading stimuli (Experiment 3), the results suggest that texture gradient information may be used to recover surface geometry of complex objects.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Liu, C.H., Collin, C.A., Farivar, R. and Chaudhuri, A.

Journal: Perception and Psychophysics

Volume: 67

Issue: 1

Pages: 158-167

ISSN: 0031-5117

DOI: 10.3758/BF03195019

Texture gradients can reveal surface orientation in a manner similar to shape from shading, and therefore provide an important cue for object recognition. In this study, we tested whether a complex 3-D object, such as a face, can be identified from texture gradients alone. The stimuli were laser-scanned faces for which the texture element was a fractal-noise pattern mapped onto the 3-D surface. An eight-alternative forced choice task was used in which participants matched a face defined by texture gradients to one of eight faces defined by shape from shading (Experiment 1) or by texture gradients (Experiment 2). On average, participants scored 24% and 18%, respectively, above chance in these experiments. Although this performance was much poorer than the performance based entirely on shape-from-shading stimuli (Experiment 3), the results suggest that texture gradient information may be used to recover surface geometry of complex objects. Copyright 2005 Psychonomic Society, Inc.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Liu, C.H., Collin, C.A., Farivar, R. and Chaudhuri, A.

Journal: PERCEPTION & PSYCHOPHYSICS

Volume: 67

Issue: 1

Pages: 158-167

ISSN: 0031-5117

DOI: 10.3758/BF03195019

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Liu, C.H., Collin, C.A., Farivar, R. and Chaudhuri, A.

Journal: Perception & psychophysics

Volume: 67

Issue: 1

Pages: 158-167

eISSN: 1532-5962

ISSN: 0031-5117

Texture gradients can reveal surface orientation in a manner similar to shape from shading, and therefore provide an important cue for object recognition. In this study, we tested whether a complex 3-D object, such as a face, can be identified from texture gradients alone. The stimuli were laser-scanned faces for which the texture element was a fractal-noise pattern mapped onto the 3-D surface. An eight-alternative forced choice task was used in which participants matched a face defined by texture gradients to one of eight faces defined by shape from shading (Experiment 1) or by texture gradients (Experiment 2). On average, participants scored 24% and 18%, respectively, above chance in these experiments. Although this performance was much poorer than the performance based entirely on shape-from-shading stimuli (Experiment 3), the results suggest that texture gradient information may be used to recover surface geometry of complex objects.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:50 on November 12, 2018.