Are there qualitative differences between face processing in photographic positive and negative?

Authors: Liu, C.H. and Chaudhuri, A.

Journal: Perception

Volume: 27

Issue: 9

Pages: 1107-1122

ISSN: 0301-0066

DOI: 10.1068/p271107

Abstract:

The question whether face recognition in photographic negative relies more on external features and pictorial cues than in photographic positive was studied in five experiments. Recognition of whole faces as well as both external and internal features of the faces was compared in experiments 1 and 2. The conditions in which views of faces between learning and test were either identical (hence providing maximum pictorial cues) or different (hence reducing such cues) were compared in experiments 3, 4, and 5. The results showed that recognition of internal features in two-tone and multi-tone images suffered more from use of photographic negatives than recognition of external features. Testing with both multi-tone and two-tone images revealed that the deficit caused by view changes between learning and test was no more severe with negatives than with positives. Finally, removing external features made recognition of different views equally more difficult for positives and negatives. Overall, these results point to a qualitative rather than quantitative difference between processing face images in photographic positive and negative.

Source: Scopus

Are there qualitative differences between face processing in photographic positive and negative?

Authors: Liu, C.H. and Chaudhuri, A.

Journal: Perception

Volume: 27

Issue: 9

Pages: 1107-1122

ISSN: 0301-0066

DOI: 10.1068/p271107

Abstract:

The question whether face recognition in photographic negative relies more on external features and pictorial cues than in photographic positive was studied in five experiments. Recognition of whole faces as well as both external and internal features of the faces was compared in experiments 1 and 2. The conditions in which views of faces between learning and test were either identical (hence providing maximum pictorial cues) or different (hence reducing such cues) were compared in experiments 3, 4, and 5. The results showed that recognition of internal features in two-tone and multi-tone images suffered more from use of photographic negatives than recognition of external features. Testing with both multi-tone and two-tone images revealed that the deficit caused by view changes between learning and test was no more severe with negatives than with positives. Finally, removing external features made recognition of different views equally more difficult for positives and negatives. Overall, these results point to a qualitative rather than quantitative difference between processing face images in photographic positive and negative.

Source: PubMed

Preferred by: Changhong Liu

Are there qualitative differences between face processing in photographic positive and negative?

Authors: Liu, C.H. and Chaudhuri, A.

Journal: PERCEPTION

Volume: 27

Issue: 9

Pages: 1107-1122

ISSN: 0301-0066

DOI: 10.1068/p271107

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Are there qualitative differences between face processing in photographic positive and negative?

Authors: Liu, C.H. and Chaudhuri, A.

Journal: Perception

Volume: 27

Issue: 9

Pages: 1107-1122

eISSN: 1468-4233

ISSN: 0301-0066

DOI: 10.1068/p271107

Abstract:

The question whether face recognition in photographic negative relies more on external features and pictorial cues than in photographic positive was studied in five experiments. Recognition of whole faces as well as both external and internal features of the faces was compared in experiments 1 and 2. The conditions in which views of faces between learning and test were either identical (hence providing maximum pictorial cues) or different (hence reducing such cues) were compared in experiments 3, 4, and 5. The results showed that recognition of internal features in two-tone and multi-tone images suffered more from use of photographic negatives than recognition of external features. Testing with both multi-tone and two-tone images revealed that the deficit caused by view changes between learning and test was no more severe with negatives than with positives. Finally, removing external features made recognition of different views equally more difficult for positives and negatives. Overall, these results point to a qualitative rather than quantitative difference between processing face images in photographic positive and negative.

Source: Europe PubMed Central

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