Matching faces with emotional expressions

Authors: Chen, W., Lander, K. and Liu, C.H.

Journal: Frontiers in Psychology

Volume: 2

Issue: AUG

eISSN: 1664-1078

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2011.00206

Abstract:

There is some evidence that faces with a happy expression are recognized better than faces with other expressions. However, little is known about whether this happy-face advantage also applies to perceptual face matching, and whether similar differences exist among other expressions. Using a sequential matching paradigm, we systematically compared the effects of seven basic facial expressions on identity recognition. Identity matching was quickest when a pair of faces had an identical happy/sad/neutral expression, poorer when they had a fearful/surprise/angry expression, and poorest when they had a disgust expression. Faces with a happy/sad/fear/surprise expression were matched faster than those with an anger/disgust expression when the second face in a pair had a neutral expression.These results demonstrate that effects of facial expression on identity recognition are not limited to happy-faces when a learned face is immediately tested. The results suggest different influences of expression in perceptual matching and long-term recognition memory. © 2011 Chen, Landerand Liu.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23999/

Source: Scopus

Preferred by: Changhong Liu

Matching faces with emotional expressions.

Authors: Chen, W., Lander, K. and Liu, C.H.

Journal: Front Psychol

Volume: 2

Pages: 206

eISSN: 1664-1078

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2011.00206

Abstract:

There is some evidence that faces with a happy expression are recognized better than faces with other expressions. However, little is known about whether this happy-face advantage also applies to perceptual face matching, and whether similar differences exist among other expressions. Using a sequential matching paradigm, we systematically compared the effects of seven basic facial expressions on identity recognition. Identity matching was quickest when a pair of faces had an identical happy/sad/neutral expression, poorer when they had a fearful/surprise/angry expression, and poorest when they had a disgust expression. Faces with a happy/sad/fear/surprise expression were matched faster than those with an anger/disgust expression when the second face in a pair had a neutral expression. These results demonstrate that effects of facial expression on identity recognition are not limited to happy-faces when a learned face is immediately tested. The results suggest different influences of expression in perceptual matching and long-term recognition memory.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23999/

Source: PubMed

Matching faces with emotional expressions.

Authors: Chen, W., Lander, K. and Liu, C.H.

Journal: Frontiers in psychology

Volume: 2

Pages: 206

eISSN: 1664-1078

ISSN: 1664-1078

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2011.00206

Abstract:

There is some evidence that faces with a happy expression are recognized better than faces with other expressions. However, little is known about whether this happy-face advantage also applies to perceptual face matching, and whether similar differences exist among other expressions. Using a sequential matching paradigm, we systematically compared the effects of seven basic facial expressions on identity recognition. Identity matching was quickest when a pair of faces had an identical happy/sad/neutral expression, poorer when they had a fearful/surprise/angry expression, and poorest when they had a disgust expression. Faces with a happy/sad/fear/surprise expression were matched faster than those with an anger/disgust expression when the second face in a pair had a neutral expression. These results demonstrate that effects of facial expression on identity recognition are not limited to happy-faces when a learned face is immediately tested. The results suggest different influences of expression in perceptual matching and long-term recognition memory.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23999/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

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