The long-term cost-effectiveness of the use of functional electrical stimulation for the correction of dropped foot due to upper motor neuron lesion

This source preferred by Ian Swain

Authors: Swain, I., Taylor, P. and Humphreys, L.

Journal: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine

Volume: 45

Pages: 154-160

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Taylor, P., Humphreys, L. and Swain, I.

Journal: J Rehabil Med

Volume: 45

Issue: 2

Pages: 154-160

eISSN: 1651-2081

DOI: 10.2340/16501977-1090

OBJECTIVE: Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) for correction of dropped foot has been shown to increase mobility, reduce the incidence of falls and to improve quality of life. This study aimed to determine how long the intervention is of benefit, and the total cost of its provision. DESIGN: Retrospective review of medical records. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred and twenty-six people with spastic dropped foot (62 stroke, 39 multiple sclerosis, 7 spinal cord injury, 3 cerebral palsy, 15 others) who began treatment in the year 1999. METHOD: All received common peroneal nerve stimulation, producing dorsiflexion and eversion time to the swing phase of gait using a heel switch. Device usage, 10 m walking speed and Functional Walking Category (FWC) were recorded. RESULTS: The median time of FES use was 3.6 years (mean 4.9, standard deviation 4.1, 95% confidence interval 4.2-5.6) with 33 people still using FES after a mean of 11.1 years. People with stroke walked a mean of 45% faster overall, including a 24% training effect with 52% improving their FWC. People with multiple sclerosis did not receive a consistent training effect but walked 29% faster when FES was used with 40% increasing their FWC. The average treatment cost was £3,095 per patient resulting in a mean cost per Quality Adjusted Life Years of £15,406. CONCLUSION: FES is a practical, long-term and cost-effective treatment for correction of dropped foot.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Taylor, P., Humphreys, L. and Swain, I.

Journal: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine

Volume: 45

Issue: 2

Pages: 154-160

ISSN: 1650-1977

DOI: 10.2340/16501977-1090

Objective: Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) for correction of dropped foot has been shown to increase mobility, reduce the incidence of falls and to improve quality of life. This study aimed to determine how long the intervention is of benefit, and the total cost of its provision. Design: Retrospective review of medical records. Participants: One hundred and twenty-six people with spastic dropped foot (62 stroke, 39 multiple sclerosis, 7 spinal cord injury, 3 cerebral palsy, 15 others) who began treatment in the year 1999. Method: All received common peroneal nerve stimulation, producing dorsiflexion and eversion time to the swing phase of gait using a heel switch. Device usage, 10 m walking speed and Functional Walking Category (FWC) were recorded. Results: The median time of FES use was 3.6 years (mean 4.9, standard deviation 4.1, 95% confidence interval 4.2-5.6) with 33 people still using FES after a mean of 11.1 years. People with stroke walked a mean of 45% faster overall, including a 24% training effect with 52% improving their FWC. People with multiple sclerosis did not receive a consistent training effect but walked 29% faster when FES was used with 40% increasing their FWC. The average treatment cost was £3,095 per patient resulting in a mean cost per Quality Adjusted Life Years of £15,406. Conclusion: FES is a practical, long-term and cost-effective treatment for correction of dropped foot. © 2013 The Authors.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Taylor, P., Humphreys, L. and Swain, I.

Journal: JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE

Volume: 45

Issue: 2

Pages: 154-160

eISSN: 1651-2081

ISSN: 1650-1977

DOI: 10.2340/16501977-1090

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Taylor, P., Humphreys, L. and Swain, I.

Journal: Journal of rehabilitation medicine

Volume: 45

Issue: 2

Pages: 154-160

eISSN: 1651-2081

ISSN: 1650-1977

OBJECTIVE: Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) for correction of dropped foot has been shown to increase mobility, reduce the incidence of falls and to improve quality of life. This study aimed to determine how long the intervention is of benefit, and the total cost of its provision. DESIGN: Retrospective review of medical records. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred and twenty-six people with spastic dropped foot (62 stroke, 39 multiple sclerosis, 7 spinal cord injury, 3 cerebral palsy, 15 others) who began treatment in the year 1999. METHOD: All received common peroneal nerve stimulation, producing dorsiflexion and eversion time to the swing phase of gait using a heel switch. Device usage, 10 m walking speed and Functional Walking Category (FWC) were recorded. RESULTS: The median time of FES use was 3.6 years (mean 4.9, standard deviation 4.1, 95% confidence interval 4.2-5.6) with 33 people still using FES after a mean of 11.1 years. People with stroke walked a mean of 45% faster overall, including a 24% training effect with 52% improving their FWC. People with multiple sclerosis did not receive a consistent training effect but walked 29% faster when FES was used with 40% increasing their FWC. The average treatment cost was £3,095 per patient resulting in a mean cost per Quality Adjusted Life Years of £15,406. CONCLUSION: FES is a practical, long-term and cost-effective treatment for correction of dropped foot.

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