The combined effect of dynamic splinting and neuromuscular electrical stimulation in reducing wrist and elbow contractures in six children with Cerebral palsy

This source preferred by Ian Swain

Authors: Swain, I., Postans, N., Wright, P., Bromwich, W., Wilkinson, I. and Farmer, S.E.

Journal: Prosthetics and Orthotics International

Volume: 34

Issue: 1

Pages: 10-19

ISSN: 0309-3646

DOI: 10.3109/03093640903051808

The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of applying the combination of Dynamic splinting (DS) and Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) in order to improve wrist and elbow function, and range of motion, in children with upper limb contractures due to Cerebral palsy (CP). Six children aged seven to 16, with contractures at the wrist or elbow, were recruited. Following a 12-week baseline period all participants underwent a 12-week treatment period where DS was used for one hour per day and combined with NMES for the second half of the 1-h treatment. A 12-week follow-up period then ensued. Upper limb function was assessed with the Melbourne assessment, physical disability with the Paediatric Evaluation of Disability Index and the Activity Scale for Kids, and quality of life with the Pediatric Quality of Life Scale. Passive and active range of motion at the wrist and elbow were measured using manual and electrical goniometers. The technique of using combined NMES and DS was demonstrated to be feasible and compliance with the intervention was good. There was an increase in passive elbow extension in two participants treated for elbow contractures, although no accompanying change in upper limb function was demonstrated. Wrist range of movement improved in one participant treated for wrist contracture.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Postans, N., Wright, P., Bromwich, W., Wilkinson, I., Farmer, S.E. and Swain, I.

Journal: Prosthet Orthot Int

Volume: 34

Issue: 1

Pages: 10-19

eISSN: 1746-1553

DOI: 10.3109/03093640903051808

The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of applying the combination of Dynamic splinting (DS) and Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) in order to improve wrist and elbow function, and range of motion, in children with upper limb contractures due to Cerebral palsy (CP). Six children aged seven to 16, with contractures at the wrist or elbow, were recruited. Following a 12-week baseline period all participants underwent a 12-week treatment period where DS was used for one hour per day and combined with NMES for the second half of the 1-h treatment. A 12-week follow-up period then ensued. Upper limb function was assessed with the Melbourne assessment, physical disability with the Paediatric Evaluation of Disability Index and the Activity Scale for Kids, and quality of life with the Pediatric Quality of Life Scale. Passive and active range of motion at the wrist and elbow were measured using manual and electrical goniometers. The technique of using combined NMES and DS was demonstrated to be feasible and compliance with the intervention was good. There was an increase in passive elbow extension in two participants treated for elbow contractures, although no accompanying change in upper limb function was demonstrated. Wrist range of movement improved in one participant treated for wrist contracture.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Postans, N., Wright, P., Bromwich, W., Wilkinson, I., Farmer, S.E. and Swain, I.

Journal: Prosthetics and Orthotics International

Volume: 34

Issue: 1

Pages: 10-19

eISSN: 1746-1553

ISSN: 0309-3646

DOI: 10.3109/03093640903051808

The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of applying the combination of Dynamic splinting (DS) and Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) in order to improve wrist and elbow function, and range of motion, in children with upper limb contractures due to Cerebral palsy (CP). Six children aged seven to 16, with contractures at the wrist or elbow, were recruited. Following a 12-week baseline period all participants underwent a 12-week treatment period where DS was used for one hour per day and combined with NMES for the second half of the 1-h treatment. A 12-week follow-up period then ensued. Upper limb function was assessed with the Melbourne assessment, physical disability with the Paediatric Evaluation of Disability Index and the Activity Scale for Kids, and quality of life with the Pediatric Quality of Life Scale. Passive and active range of motion at the wrist and elbow were measured using manual and electrical goniometers. The technique of using combined NMES and DS was demonstrated to be feasible and compliance with the intervention was good. There was an increase in passive elbow extension in two participants treated for elbow contractures, although no accompanying change in upper limb function was demonstrated. Wrist range of movement improved in one participant treated for wrist contracture. © 2010 ISPO.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Postans, N., Wright, P., Bromwich, W., Wilkinson, I., Farmer, S.E. and Swain, I.

Journal: PROSTHETICS AND ORTHOTICS INTERNATIONAL

Volume: 34

Issue: 1

Pages: 10-19

ISSN: 0309-3646

DOI: 10.3109/03093640903051808

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Postans, N., Wright, P., Bromwich, W., Wilkinson, I., Farmer, S.E. and Swain, I.

Journal: Prosthetics and orthotics international

Volume: 34

Issue: 1

Pages: 10-19

eISSN: 1746-1553

ISSN: 0309-3646

The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of applying the combination of Dynamic splinting (DS) and Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) in order to improve wrist and elbow function, and range of motion, in children with upper limb contractures due to Cerebral palsy (CP). Six children aged seven to 16, with contractures at the wrist or elbow, were recruited. Following a 12-week baseline period all participants underwent a 12-week treatment period where DS was used for one hour per day and combined with NMES for the second half of the 1-h treatment. A 12-week follow-up period then ensued. Upper limb function was assessed with the Melbourne assessment, physical disability with the Paediatric Evaluation of Disability Index and the Activity Scale for Kids, and quality of life with the Pediatric Quality of Life Scale. Passive and active range of motion at the wrist and elbow were measured using manual and electrical goniometers. The technique of using combined NMES and DS was demonstrated to be feasible and compliance with the intervention was good. There was an increase in passive elbow extension in two participants treated for elbow contractures, although no accompanying change in upper limb function was demonstrated. Wrist range of movement improved in one participant treated for wrist contracture.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:53 on April 26, 2019.