Anticipating intentional actions: The effect of eye gaze direction on the judgment of head rotation

Authors: Hudson, M., Liu, C.H. and Jellema, T.

Journal: Cognition

Volume: 112

Issue: 3

Pages: 423-434

ISSN: 0010-0277

DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2009.06.011

Abstract:

Using a representational momentum paradigm, this study investigated the hypothesis that judgments of how far another agent's head has rotated are influenced by the perceived gaze direction of the head. Participants observed a video-clip of a face rotating 60° towards them starting from the left or right profile view. The gaze direction of the face was either congruent with, ahead of, or lagging behind the angle of rotation. Following this, two static faces, at varying angles of rotation with respect to the end-point angle of the face in the video-clip, were presented simultaneously. The task of the participants was to decide which of the two heads was at an angle best resembling the angle of the end-point of the moving face. The critical test condition consisted of one test face oriented at 10° before, and the other at 10° after the end-point. The 'lagging behind' gaze condition elicited a significant underestimation of the rotation compared to the 'congruent' and 'ahead' gaze conditions. Participants did not exhibit similar biases when judging the rotation of several non-face control stimuli with visual features that mimicked different aspects of gaze direction. The findings suggest that when the gaze direction of a perceived agent is incongruent with the direction of the agent's head motion observers automatically utilise this discrepancy to adjust their inferences about the agent's intended heading direction. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Source: Scopus

Anticipating intentional actions: the effect of eye gaze direction on the judgment of head rotation.

Authors: Hudson, M., Liu, C.H. and Jellema, T.

Journal: Cognition

Volume: 112

Issue: 3

Pages: 423-434

eISSN: 1873-7838

DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2009.06.011

Abstract:

Using a representational momentum paradigm, this study investigated the hypothesis that judgments of how far another agent's head has rotated are influenced by the perceived gaze direction of the head. Participants observed a video-clip of a face rotating 60 degrees towards them starting from the left or right profile view. The gaze direction of the face was either congruent with, ahead of, or lagging behind the angle of rotation. Following this, two static faces, at varying angles of rotation with respect to the end-point angle of the face in the video-clip, were presented simultaneously. The task of the participants was to decide which of the two heads was at an angle best resembling the angle of the end-point of the moving face. The critical test condition consisted of one test face oriented at 10 degrees before, and the other at 10 degrees after the end-point. The 'lagging behind' gaze condition elicited a significant underestimation of the rotation compared to the 'congruent' and 'ahead' gaze conditions. Participants did not exhibit similar biases when judging the rotation of several non-face control stimuli with visual features that mimicked different aspects of gaze direction. The findings suggest that when the gaze direction of a perceived agent is incongruent with the direction of the agent's head motion observers automatically utilise this discrepancy to adjust their inferences about the agent's intended heading direction.

Source: PubMed

Anticipating intentional actions: The effect of eye gaze direction on the judgment of head rotation.

Authors: Hudson, M., Liu, C.H. and Jellema, T.

Editors: Altmann

Journal: Cognition

Volume: 112

Pages: 423-434

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Changhong Liu

Anticipating intentional actions: the effect of eye gaze direction on the judgment of head rotation.

Authors: Hudson, M., Liu, C.H. and Jellema, T.

Journal: Cognition

Volume: 112

Issue: 3

Pages: 423-434

eISSN: 1873-7838

ISSN: 0010-0277

DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2009.06.011

Abstract:

Using a representational momentum paradigm, this study investigated the hypothesis that judgments of how far another agent's head has rotated are influenced by the perceived gaze direction of the head. Participants observed a video-clip of a face rotating 60 degrees towards them starting from the left or right profile view. The gaze direction of the face was either congruent with, ahead of, or lagging behind the angle of rotation. Following this, two static faces, at varying angles of rotation with respect to the end-point angle of the face in the video-clip, were presented simultaneously. The task of the participants was to decide which of the two heads was at an angle best resembling the angle of the end-point of the moving face. The critical test condition consisted of one test face oriented at 10 degrees before, and the other at 10 degrees after the end-point. The 'lagging behind' gaze condition elicited a significant underestimation of the rotation compared to the 'congruent' and 'ahead' gaze conditions. Participants did not exhibit similar biases when judging the rotation of several non-face control stimuli with visual features that mimicked different aspects of gaze direction. The findings suggest that when the gaze direction of a perceived agent is incongruent with the direction of the agent's head motion observers automatically utilise this discrepancy to adjust their inferences about the agent's intended heading direction.

Source: Europe PubMed Central

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