How many founders for a biological invasion? Predicting introduction outcomes from propagule pressure

This source preferred by Robert Britton

Authors: Britton, J. and Gozlan, R.

Journal: Ecology

DOI: 10.1890/13-0527.1

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Britton, J.R. and Gozlan, R.E.

Journal: Ecology

Volume: 94

Issue: 11

Pages: 2558-2566

ISSN: 0012-9658

Ecological theory on biological invasions attempts to characterize the predictors of invasion success and the relative importance of the different drivers of population establishment. An outstanding question is how propagule pressure determines the probability of population establishment, where propagule pressure is the number of individuals of a species introduced into a specific location (propagule size) and their frequency of introduction (propagule number). Here, we used large-scale replicated mesocosm ponds over three reproductive seasons to identify how propagule size and number predict the probability of establishment of one of world's most invasive fish, Pseudorasbora parva, as well as its effect on the somatic growth of individuals during establishment. We demonstrated that, although a threshold of 11 introduced pairs of fish (a pair is 1 male, 1 female) was required for establishment probability to exceed 95%, establishment also occurred at low propagule size (1-5 pairs). Although single introduction events were as effective as multiple events at enabling establishment, the propagule sizes used in the multiple introductions were above the detected threshold for establishment. After three reproductive seasons, population abundance was also a function of propagule size, with rapid increases in abundance only apparent when propagule size exceeded 25 pairs. This was initially assisted by adapted biological traits, including rapid individual somatic growth that helped to overcome demographic bottlenecks.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Britton, J.R. and Gozlan, R.E.

Journal: Ecology

Volume: 94

Issue: 11

Pages: 2558-2566

ISSN: 0012-9658

DOI: 10.1890/13-0527.1

Ecological theory on biological invasions attempts to characterize the predictors of invasion success and the relative importance of the different drivers of population establishment. An outstanding question is how propagule pressure determines the probability of population establishment, where propagule pressure is the number of individuals of a species introduced into a specific location (propagule size) and their frequency of introduction (propagule number). Here, we used large-scale replicated mesocosm ponds over three reproductive seasons to identify how propagule size and number predict the probability of establishment of one of world's most invasive fish, Pseudorasbora parva, as well as its effect on the somatic growth of individuals during establishment. We demonstrated that, although a threshold of 11 introduced pairs of fish (a pair is 1 male, 1 female) was required for establishment probability to exceed 95%, establishment also occurred at low propagule size (1- 5 pairs). Although single introduction events were as effective as multiple events at enabling establishment, the propagule sizes used in the multiple introductions were above the detected threshold for establishment. After three reproductive seasons, population abundance was also a function of propagule size, with rapid increases in abundance only apparent when propagule size exceeded 25 pairs. This was initially assisted by adapted biological traits, including rapid individual somatic growth that helped to overcome demographic bottlenecks. © 2013 by the Ecological Society of America.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Britton, J.R. and Gozlan, R.E.

Journal: ECOLOGY

Volume: 94

Issue: 11

Pages: 2558-2566

eISSN: 1939-9170

ISSN: 0012-9658

DOI: 10.1890/13-0527.1

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Britton, J.R. and Gozlan, R.E.

Journal: Ecology

Volume: 94

Issue: 11

Pages: 2558-2566

eISSN: 1939-9170

ISSN: 0012-9658

Ecological theory on biological invasions attempts to characterize the predictors of invasion success and the relative importance of the different drivers of population establishment. An outstanding question is how propagule pressure determines the probability of population establishment, where propagule pressure is the number of individuals of a species introduced into a specific location (propagule size) and their frequency of introduction (propagule number). Here, we used large-scale replicated mesocosm ponds over three reproductive seasons to identify how propagule size and number predict the probability of establishment of one of world's most invasive fish, Pseudorasbora parva, as well as its effect on the somatic growth of individuals during establishment. We demonstrated that, although a threshold of 11 introduced pairs of fish (a pair is 1 male, 1 female) was required for establishment probability to exceed 95%, establishment also occurred at low propagule size (1-5 pairs). Although single introduction events were as effective as multiple events at enabling establishment, the propagule sizes used in the multiple introductions were above the detected threshold for establishment. After three reproductive seasons, population abundance was also a function of propagule size, with rapid increases in abundance only apparent when propagule size exceeded 25 pairs. This was initially assisted by adapted biological traits, including rapid individual somatic growth that helped to overcome demographic bottlenecks.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:18 on July 23, 2019.