Alien knowledge: Preparing student midwives for learning about infant feeding-Education practice at a UK university

Authors: Angell, C. and Angell, R.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21746/

Journal: Journal of Advertising Research

This article presents researchers in advertising and marketing with ‘Draw, Write and Tell’ (DWT), an innovative creative method suitable for research with younger children (5-11 years). A case study using an advertisement promoting Kellogg’s Rice Krispies cereal illustrates how DWT can be implemented in practice. The researchers conclude that the method offers several benefits. Data quality is high as a result of participant and stakeholder ‘buy in’, the application of ‘visualization’ methods and the possibility of data triangulation through its ‘multi-method’ design. Advertisers can use the results for ‘evaluating’ children’s responses to advertising material, whilst enhanced creativity provides an opportunity for the ‘modification’ of communications. Limitations of DWT with directions for its future development are also considered.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Angell, C. and Taylor, A.M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21746/

Journal: Nurse Educ Today

Volume: 33

Issue: 11

Pages: 1411-1415

eISSN: 1532-2793

DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2012.10.013

Infant feeding education forms a key element in undergraduate midwifery education in the UK. Students must be prepared to provide women with support and information to make appropriate health choices for themselves and their infants. However, student midwives may already have developed opinions about infant feeding prior to commencing a midwifery education programme. The education literature suggests that existing attitudes may present a barrier to learning for some students. This particularly applies to learning in relation to sensitive or emotionally laden subjects. A review of the literature was undertaken to identify potential teaching approaches which might help students to overcome barriers to learning. Following this the evidence was utilised at a UK university to develop activities which prepare student midwives for effective learning around infant feeding. Students enrolled in the midwifery education programme were introduced to a number of activities aimed at encouraging them to accommodate unfamiliar ideas or 'alien knowledge'. These included placing students in situations which challenged their ideas, as well as engaging in group discussions and reflective exercises. The impact of these educational interventions was identified through formative and summative assessment, and through evaluation of the teaching strategy at the end of the programme. This demonstrated that, amongst those students with previously negative attitudes towards infant feeding, there was a move towards more positive attitudes and a greater confidence in providing evidence based information to parents.

This source preferred by Catherine Angell and Alison Taylor

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Angell, C. and Taylor, A.M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21746/

Journal: Nurse Education Today

Volume: 33

Issue: 11

Pages: 1411-1415

eISSN: 1532-2793

ISSN: 0260-6917

DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2012.10.013

Infant feeding education forms a key element in undergraduate midwifery education in the UK. Students must be prepared to provide women with support and information to make appropriate health choices for themselves and their infants. However, student midwives may already have developed opinions about infant feeding prior to commencing a midwifery education programme. The education literature suggests that existing attitudes may present a barrier to learning for some students. This particularly applies to learning in relation to sensitive or emotionally laden subjects. A review of the literature was undertaken to identify potential teaching approaches which might help students to overcome barriers to learning. Following this the evidence was utilised at a UK university to develop activities which prepare student midwives for effective learning around infant feeding. Students enrolled in the midwifery education programme were introduced to a number of activities aimed at encouraging them to accommodate unfamiliar ideas or 'alien knowledge'. These included placing students in situations which challenged their ideas, as well as engaging in group discussions and reflective exercises. The impact of these educational interventions was identified through formative and summative assessment, and through evaluation of the teaching strategy at the end of the programme. This demonstrated that, amongst those students with previously negative attitudes towards infant feeding, there was a move towards more positive attitudes and a greater confidence in providing evidence based information to parents. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

This source preferred by Catherine Angell and Alison Taylor

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Angell, C. and Taylor, A.M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21746/

Journal: Nurse Education Today

eISSN: 1532-2793

ISSN: 0260-6917

DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2012.10.013

Infant feeding education forms a key element in undergraduate midwifery education in the UK. Students must be prepared to provide women with support and information to make appropriate health choices for themselves and their infants. However, student midwives may already have developed opinions about infant feeding prior to commencing a midwifery education programme. The education literature suggests that existing attitudes may present a barrier to learning for some students. This particularly applies to learning in relation to sensitive or emotionally laden subjects. A review of the literature was undertaken to identify potential teaching approaches which might help students to overcome barriers to learning. Following this the evidence was utilised at a UK university to develop activities which prepare student midwives for effective learning around infant feeding. Students enrolled in the midwifery education programme were introduced to a number of activities aimed at encouraging them to accommodate unfamiliar ideas or 'alien knowledge'. These included placing students in situations which challenged their ideas, as well as engaging in group discussions and reflective exercises. The impact of these educational interventions was identified through formative and summative assessment, and through evaluation of the teaching strategy at the end of the programme. This demonstrated that, amongst those students with previously negative attitudes towards infant feeding, there was a move towards more positive attitudes and a greater confidence in providing evidence based information to parents. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Angell, C. and Taylor, A.M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21746/

Journal: NURSE EDUCATION TODAY

Volume: 33

Issue: 11

Pages: 1411-1415

eISSN: 1532-2793

ISSN: 0260-6917

DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2012.10.013

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Angell, C. and Taylor, A.M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21746/

Journal: Nurse education today

Volume: 33

Issue: 11

Pages: 1411-1415

eISSN: 1532-2793

ISSN: 0260-6917

Infant feeding education forms a key element in undergraduate midwifery education in the UK. Students must be prepared to provide women with support and information to make appropriate health choices for themselves and their infants. However, student midwives may already have developed opinions about infant feeding prior to commencing a midwifery education programme. The education literature suggests that existing attitudes may present a barrier to learning for some students. This particularly applies to learning in relation to sensitive or emotionally laden subjects. A review of the literature was undertaken to identify potential teaching approaches which might help students to overcome barriers to learning. Following this the evidence was utilised at a UK university to develop activities which prepare student midwives for effective learning around infant feeding. Students enrolled in the midwifery education programme were introduced to a number of activities aimed at encouraging them to accommodate unfamiliar ideas or 'alien knowledge'. These included placing students in situations which challenged their ideas, as well as engaging in group discussions and reflective exercises. The impact of these educational interventions was identified through formative and summative assessment, and through evaluation of the teaching strategy at the end of the programme. This demonstrated that, amongst those students with previously negative attitudes towards infant feeding, there was a move towards more positive attitudes and a greater confidence in providing evidence based information to parents.

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