Application of Confocal Microscopy for 3D Assessment of Carotid Plaque Structure: Implications for Carotid Blood Flow and Stroke Research.

This source preferred by Ahmed Khattab

Authors: Khattab, A.D., Wertheim, D., Petford, N., Kirk, R., Wijesinghe, L. and Ali, I.S.

Journal: Journal of Vascular and Interventional Neurology

Volume: 4

Pages: 1-4

Background: Little information is available on how forces resulting from fluid flow interact with structural stability of carotid atherosclerotic plaque and how such interactions may impact on stroke prevention; investigation of the 3D structure of plaque could help in such studies. The aim of this study was to investigate whether confocal microscopy can be used to obtain 3D visualization of the structure of atherosclerotic carotid plaques.

Methods: Carotid plaque specimens were collected from routine end-arterectomy surgical operations. Both bright-field microscopy and Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) were used to generate 3D image data-sets and visualizations of surgically removed carotid plaques.

Results: Evidence of carotid plaque vulnerability was demonstrated by reduced fibrous cap thickness and large lipid-necrotic core with evidence of cracking.

Conclusion: The generation of 3D images of carotid plaques could help in: (i) investigating key features that affect plaque structural stability; (ii) comparing 3D microstructure of the plaque with clinical imaging assessment and blood flow investigations; and (iii) developing markers to identify patients requiring clinical intervention.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Khattab, A., Wertheim, D., Petford, N., Kirk, R., Wijesinghe, L. and Ali, I.

Journal: J Vasc Interv Neurol

Volume: 4

Issue: 2

Pages: 1-4

eISSN: 1944-141X

BACKGROUND: Little information is available on how forces resulting from fluid flow interact with structural stability of carotid atherosclerotic plaque and how such interactions may impact on stroke prevention; investigation of the 3D structure of plaque could help in such studies. The aim of this study was to investigate whether confocal microscopy can be used to obtain 3D visualization of the structure of atherosclerotic carotid plaques. METHODS: Carotid plaque specimens were collected from routine end-arterectomy surgical operations. Both bright-field microscopy and Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) were used to generate 3D image data-sets and visualizations of surgically removed carotid plaques. RESULTS: Evidence of carotid plaque vulnerability was demonstrated by reduced fibrous cap thickness and large lipid-necrotic core with evidence of cracking. CONCLUSION: The generation of 3D images of carotid plaques could help in: (i) investigating key features that affect plaque structural stability; (ii) comparing 3D microstructure of the plaque with clinical imaging assessment and blood flow investigations; and (iii) developing markers to identify patients requiring clinical intervention.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Khattab, A., Wertheim, D., Petford, N., Kirk, R., Wijesinghe, L. and Ali, I.

Journal: Journal of vascular and interventional neurology

Volume: 4

Issue: 2

Pages: 1-4

eISSN: 1944-141X

ISSN: 1941-5893

BACKGROUND: Little information is available on how forces resulting from fluid flow interact with structural stability of carotid atherosclerotic plaque and how such interactions may impact on stroke prevention; investigation of the 3D structure of plaque could help in such studies. The aim of this study was to investigate whether confocal microscopy can be used to obtain 3D visualization of the structure of atherosclerotic carotid plaques. METHODS: Carotid plaque specimens were collected from routine end-arterectomy surgical operations. Both bright-field microscopy and Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) were used to generate 3D image data-sets and visualizations of surgically removed carotid plaques. RESULTS: Evidence of carotid plaque vulnerability was demonstrated by reduced fibrous cap thickness and large lipid-necrotic core with evidence of cracking. CONCLUSION: The generation of 3D images of carotid plaques could help in: (i) investigating key features that affect plaque structural stability; (ii) comparing 3D microstructure of the plaque with clinical imaging assessment and blood flow investigations; and (iii) developing markers to identify patients requiring clinical intervention.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:17 on May 25, 2020.