Evidence of female preference for hidden sex signals in distant fish species

This source preferred by Demetra Andreou and Robert Britton

Authors: Gozlan, R.E., Burnard, D., Britton, J.R. and Andreou, D.

Journal: Behavioural Ecology

Volume: 25

Issue: 1

Pages: 53-57

DOI: 10.1093/beheco/art084

Strong selection against heterospecific sex signals, which includes both receivers and signallers, is considered to be the most significant causal factor in animal signal modification and is expected to prevent mate misinterpretation. Using a simultaneous choice bioassay, we tested the continued use of primordial sex signals in distantly related and geographically separated fish species, Pseudorasbora parva and Pimephales promelas. Here, we show that intraspecific selection pressures have not caused significant sex chemical signal differentiation between the 2 species and that mate attraction is likely due to a combination of common ancestry and an absence of divergence in allopatry. In the absence of mate discrimination among species, which have evolved for long periods of time in allopatry, reunification through species translocation could represent an overlooked risk of pheromone pollution.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Gozlan, R.E., Burnard, D., Robert Britton, J. and Andreou, D.

Journal: Behavioral Ecology

Volume: 25

Issue: 1

Pages: 53-57

eISSN: 1465-7279

ISSN: 1045-2249

DOI: 10.1093/beheco/art084

Strong selection against heterospecific sex signals, which includes both receivers and signallers, is considered to be the most significant causal factor in animal signal modification and is expected to prevent mate misinterpretation. Using a simultaneous choice bioassay, we tested the continued use of primordial sex signals in distantly related and geographically separated fish species, Pseudorasbora parva and Pimephales promelas. Here, we show that intraspecific selection pressures have not caused significant sex chemical signal differentiation between the 2 species and that mate attraction is likely due to a combination of common ancestry and an absence of divergence in allopatry. In the absence of mate discrimination among species, which have evolved for long periods of time in allopatry, reunification through species translocation could represent an overlooked risk of pheromone pollution. © The Author 2013.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Gozlan, R.E., Burnard, D., Britton, J.R. and Andreou, D.

Journal: BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY

Volume: 25

Issue: 1

Pages: 53-57

eISSN: 1465-7279

ISSN: 1045-2249

DOI: 10.1093/beheco/art084

The data on this page was last updated at 05:18 on July 19, 2019.