Popular music, psychogeography, place identity and tourism: The case of Sheffield

Authors: Lashua, B., Spracklen, K., Long, P. and Long, P.

Journal: Tourist Studies

Volume: 14

Issue: 1

Pages: 48-65

eISSN: 1741-3206

ISSN: 1468-7976

DOI: 10.1177/1468797613511685

Abstract:

Tourism and cultural agencies in some English provincial cities are promoting their popular music ‘heritage’ and, in some cases, contemporary musicians through the packaging of trails, sites, ‘iconic’ venues and festivals. This article focuses on Sheffield, a ‘post-industrial’ northern English city which is drawing on its associations with musicians past and present in seeking to attract tourists. This article is based on interviews with, among others, recording artists, promoters, producers and venue managers, along with reflective observational and documentary data. Theoretical remarks are made on the representations of popular musicians through cultural tourism strategies, programmes and products and also on the ways in which musicians convey a ‘psychogeographical’ sense of place in the ‘soundscape’ of the city. © 2013, SAGE Publications. All rights reserved.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21159/

Source: Scopus

Popular music, psychogeography, place identity and tourism: The case of Sheffield

Authors: Long, P.

Journal: TOURIST STUDIES

Volume: 14

Issue: 1

Pages: 48-65

eISSN: 1741-3206

ISSN: 1468-7976

DOI: 10.1177/1468797613511685

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21159/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Popular music, psychogeography, place identity and tourism: The case of Sheffield

Authors: Long, P.

Journal: Tourist Studies: an international journal

Volume: 14

Issue: 1

Pages: 48-65

ISSN: 1468-7976

DOI: 10.1177/1468797613511685

Abstract:

Tourism and cultural agencies in some English provincial cities are promoting their popular music ‘heritage’ and, in some cases, contemporary musicians through the packaging of trails, sites, ‘iconic’ venues and festivals. This article focuses on Sheffield, a ‘post-industrial’ northern English city which is drawing on its associations with musicians past and present in seeking to attract tourists. This article is based on interviews with, among others, recording artists, promoters, producers and venue managers, along with reflective observational and documentary data. Theoretical remarks are made on the representations of popular musicians through cultural tourism strategies, programmes and products and also on the ways in which musicians convey a ‘psychogeographical’ sense of place in the ‘soundscape’ of the city.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21159/

http://tou.sagepub.com/content/early/recent

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Philip Long