9th millennium plant subsistence in the central Anatolian highlands: New evidence from Pinarbaşi, Karaman Province, central Anatolia

This source preferred by Emma Jenkins

Authors: Fairbairn, A., Jenkins, E., Baird, D. and Jacobsen, G.

Journal: Journal of Archaeological Science

Volume: 41

Pages: 801-812

Plant macrofossil analysis, phytolith analysis and AMS radiocarbon dating at Pınarbaşı in central Anatolia confirm the presence and continuity of plant gathering practice as a key subsistence strategy from c. 9000–7700 cal BC. Results demonstrate the use of almond, terebinth and hackberry as food plants, similar to Palaeolithic/Epipalaeolithic subsistence strategies in the Antalya region. Crop and/or crop progenitor use is unsupported, with sporadic cereal macrofossils rare and shown by direct radiocarbon dating to be intrusive, a conclusion supported by the phytolith analysis. Seed exploitation is also rejected. Results confirm the presence of sedentary foragers from 9000 cal BC in central Anatolia, contemporary with the Levantine PPNA-Early PPNB, suggest a different plant subsistence focus to contemporary forager societies in the Fertile Crescent and indicate economic differences with contemporary sites in central Anatolia which were already cultivating crops.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Fairbairn, A.S., Jenkins, E., Baird, D. and Jacobsen, G.

Journal: Journal of Archaeological Science

Volume: 41

Pages: 801-812

eISSN: 1095-9238

ISSN: 0305-4403

DOI: 10.1016/j.jas.2013.09.024

Plant macrofossil analysis, phytolith analysis and AMS radiocarbon dating at Pinarbaşi in central Anatolia confirm the presence and continuity of plant gathering practice as a key subsistence strategy from c. 9000-7700cal BC. Results demonstrate the use of almond, terebinth and hackberry as food plants, similar to Palaeolithic/Epipalaeolithic subsistence strategies in the Antalya region. Crop and/or crop progenitor use is unsupported, with sporadic cereal macrofossils rare and shown by direct radiocarbon dating to be intrusive, a conclusion supported by the phytolith analysis. Seed exploitation is also rejected. Results confirm the presence of sedentary foragers from 9000cal BC in central Anatolia, contemporary with the Levantine PPNA-Early PPNB, suggest a different plant subsistence focus to contemporary forager societies in the Fertile Crescent and indicate economic differences with contemporary sites in central Anatolia which were already cultivating crops. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Fairbairn, A.S., Jenkins, E., Baird, D. and Jacobsen, G.

Journal: JOURNAL OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Volume: 41

Pages: 801-812

eISSN: 1095-9238

ISSN: 0305-4403

DOI: 10.1016/j.jas.2013.09.024

The data on this page was last updated at 05:10 on February 17, 2020.