The rise and fall of the 'nudge' of minimum unit pricing: The continuity of neoliberalism in alcohol policy in England

Authors: Haydock, W.

Journal: Critical Social Policy

Volume: 34

Issue: 2

Pages: 260-279

eISSN: 1461-703X

ISSN: 0261-0183

DOI: 10.1177/0261018313514804

Abstract:

This article explores the continuities in alcohol policy over the past decade under both Labour and Coalition governments. It is argued that these continuities reflect a neoliberal mentality of government whereby market mechanisms are maintained even when the outcomes produced are deemed undesirable. Policies to address these outcomes have focused on the individual citizen, conceived of as a potentially rational decision-maker. If exhortations to behave in the desired fashion do not reap results then measures are targeted at specific individuals or groups of individuals considered flawed consumers. The continuity is examined in light of recent commentary that has identified a trend in policymaking reflecting a loss of confidence in individual rationality and market outcomes, described variously as post-liberalism or neocommunitarianism. It is suggested that the stability of the broader underlying structures of thought that circumscribe contemporary policy discussions should not be underestimated. © The Author(s) 2014.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21549/

Source: Scopus

The rise and fall of the 'nudge' of minimum unit pricing: The continuity of neoliberalism in alcohol policy in England

Authors: Haydock, W.

Journal: CRITICAL SOCIAL POLICY

Volume: 34

Issue: 2

Pages: 260-279

eISSN: 1461-703X

ISSN: 0261-0183

DOI: 10.1177/0261018313514804

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21549/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

The rise and fall of the ‘nudge’ of minimum unit pricing: The continuity of neoliberalism in alcohol policy in England

Authors: Haydock, W.

Journal: Critical Social Policy

Volume: 34

Issue: 2

Pages: 260-279

DOI: 10.1177/0261018313514804

Abstract:

This article explores the continuities in alcohol policy over the past decade under both Labour and Coalition governments. It is argued that these continuities reflect a neoliberal mentality of government whereby market mechanisms are maintained even when the outcomes produced are deemed undesirable. Policies to address these outcomes have focused on the individual citizen, conceived of as a potentially rational decision-maker. If exhortations to behave in the desired fashion do not reap results then measures are targeted at specific individuals or groups of individuals considered flawed consumers. The continuity is examined in light of recent commentary that has identified a trend in policymaking reflecting a loss of confidence in individual rationality and market outcomes, described variously as post-liberalism or neocommunitarianism. It is suggested that the stability of the broader underlying structures of thought that circumscribe contemporary policy discussions should not be underestimated.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21549/

http://csp.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/01/20/0261018313514804.abstract

Source: Manual

Preferred by: William Haydock