Kinds of well-being: A conceptual framework that provides direction for caring

This source preferred by Les Todres

Authors: Galvin, K.T. and Todres, L.

Journal: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being

Volume: 6

ISSN: 1748-2623

DOI: 10.3402/qhw.v6i4.10362

This article offers a conceptual framework by which different kinds and levels of well-being can be named, and as such,provides a foundation for a resource-oriented approach in situations of illness and vulnerability (rather than a deficit-orientedapproach). Building on a previous paper that articulated the philosophical foundations of an existential theory ofwell-being (‘‘Dwelling-mobility’’), we show here how the theory can be further developed towards practice-relevantconcerns. We introduce 18 kinds of well-being that are intertwined and inter-related, and consider how each emphasis canlead to the formulation of resources that have the potential to give rise to well-being as a felt experience. By focusing on a much wider range of well-being possibilities, practitioners may find new directions for care that are not just literal but also at an existential level.

Key words: Phenomenology, well-being, existential, conceptual framework, caring science, care, philosophy, Heidegger

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Galvin, K.T. and Todres, L.

Journal: Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being

Volume: 6

Issue: 4

eISSN: 1748-2631

DOI: 10.3402/qhw.v6i4.10362

This article offers a conceptual framework by which different kinds and levels of well-being can be named, and as such, provides a foundation for a resource-oriented approach in situations of illness and vulnerability (rather than a deficit-oriented approach). Building on a previous paper that articulated the philosophical foundations of an existential theory of well-being ("Dwelling-mobility"), we show here how the theory can be further developed towards practice-relevant concerns. We introduce 18 kinds of well-being that are intertwined and inter-related, and consider how each emphasis can lead to the formulation of resources that have the potential to give rise to well-being as a felt experience. By focusing on a much wider range of well-being possibilities, practitioners may find new directions for care that are not just literal but also at an existential level.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Galvin, K.T. and Todres, L.

Journal: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being

Volume: 6

Issue: 4

eISSN: 1748-2631

ISSN: 1748-2623

DOI: 10.3402/qhw.v6i4.10362

This article offers a conceptual framework by which different kinds and levels of well-being can be named, and as such, provides a foundation for a resource-oriented approach in situations of illness and vulnerability (rather than a deficitoriented approach). Building on a previous paper that articulated the philosophical foundations of an existential theory of well-being ("Dwelling-mobility"), we show here how the theory can be further developed towards practice-relevant concerns. We introduce 18 kinds of well-being that are intertwined and inter-related, and consider how each emphasis can lead to the formulation of resources that have the potential to give rise to well-being as a felt experience. By focusing on a much wider range of well-being possibilities, practitioners may find new directions for care that are not just literal but also at an existential level. © 2011 K. T. Galvin & L. Todres.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Galvin, K.T. and Todres, L.

Journal: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF QUALITATIVE STUDIES ON HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

Volume: 6

Issue: 4

ISSN: 1748-2623

DOI: 10.3402/qhw.v6i4.10362

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Galvin, K.T. and Todres, L.

Journal: International journal of qualitative studies on health and well-being

Volume: 6

Issue: 4

Pages: 359

eISSN: 1748-2631

ISSN: 1748-2623

This article offers a conceptual framework by which different kinds and levels of well-being can be named, and as such, provides a foundation for a resource-oriented approach in situations of illness and vulnerability (rather than a deficit-oriented approach). Building on a previous paper that articulated the philosophical foundations of an existential theory of well-being ("Dwelling-mobility"), we show here how the theory can be further developed towards practice-relevant concerns. We introduce 18 kinds of well-being that are intertwined and inter-related, and consider how each emphasis can lead to the formulation of resources that have the potential to give rise to well-being as a felt experience. By focusing on a much wider range of well-being possibilities, practitioners may find new directions for care that are not just literal but also at an existential level.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:30 on January 21, 2021.