Experience of clinical use of the Odstock dropped foot stimulator

This source preferred by Ian Swain

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Burridge, J., Taylor, P., Hagan, S. and Swain, I.

Journal: Artif Organs

Volume: 21

Issue: 3

Pages: 254-260

ISSN: 0160-564X

The Odstock dropped foot stimulator (ODFS) is a simple functional electrical stimulation (FES) device for the correction of dropped foot. Improved reliability, fine control of stimulation parameters, and careful application and follow-up have let to 86% compliance. Data on 56 patients (50 patients with hemiplegia, 5 patients with multiple sclerosis, and 1 patient with spinal cord injury) who have used the system for between 6 and 18 months are presented and show a statistically significant increase in walking speed with the stimulator at 3 months of 14% (p < 0.001); decreased effort of walking, measured as physiological cost index (PCI), of 37% (p < 0.001); and statistically significant improvement in functional mobility tests and questionnaires. No statistically significant carryover was seen although 3 patients had sufficient improvement in active ankle control and gait parameters to no longer need the stimulator. Six patients who used the stimulator all day every day had a problem with skin irritation, which we have not yet been able to solve. Two patients discontinued use after experiencing increased spasticity in the calf.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Burridge, J., Taylor, P., Hagan, S. and Swain, I.

Journal: Artificial Organs

Volume: 21

Issue: 3

Pages: 254-260

ISSN: 0160-564X

DOI: 10.1111/j.1525-1594.1997.tb04662.x

The Odstock dropped foot stimulator (ODFS) is a simple functional electrical stimulation (FES) device for the correction of dropped foot. Improved reliability, fine control of stimulation parameters, and careful application and follow-up have led to 86% compliance. Data on 56 patients (50 patients with hemiplegia, 5 patients with multiple sclerosis, and 1 patient with spinal cord injury) who have used the system for between 6 and 18 months are presented and show a statistically significant increase in walking speed with the stimulator at 3 months of 14% (p < 0.001); decreased effort of walking, measured as physiological cost index (PCI), of 37% (p < 0.001); and statistically significant improvement in functional mobility tests and questionnaires. No statistically significant carryover was seen although 3 patients had sufficient improvement in active ankle control and gait parameters to no longer need the stimulator. Six patients who used the stimulator all day every day had a problem with skin irritation, which we have not yet been able to solve. Two patients discontinued use after experiencing increased spasticity in the calf.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Burridge, J., Taylor, P., Hagan, S. and Swain, I.

Journal: ARTIFICIAL ORGANS

Volume: 21

Issue: 3

Pages: 254-260

ISSN: 0160-564X

DOI: 10.1111/j.1525-1594.1997.tb04662.x

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Burridge, J., Taylor, P., Hagan, S. and Swain, I.

Journal: Artificial organs

Volume: 21

Issue: 3

Pages: 254-260

eISSN: 1525-1594

ISSN: 0160-564X

The Odstock dropped foot stimulator (ODFS) is a simple functional electrical stimulation (FES) device for the correction of dropped foot. Improved reliability, fine control of stimulation parameters, and careful application and follow-up have let to 86% compliance. Data on 56 patients (50 patients with hemiplegia, 5 patients with multiple sclerosis, and 1 patient with spinal cord injury) who have used the system for between 6 and 18 months are presented and show a statistically significant increase in walking speed with the stimulator at 3 months of 14% (p < 0.001); decreased effort of walking, measured as physiological cost index (PCI), of 37% (p < 0.001); and statistically significant improvement in functional mobility tests and questionnaires. No statistically significant carryover was seen although 3 patients had sufficient improvement in active ankle control and gait parameters to no longer need the stimulator. Six patients who used the stimulator all day every day had a problem with skin irritation, which we have not yet been able to solve. Two patients discontinued use after experiencing increased spasticity in the calf.

The data on this page was last updated at 10:28 on April 24, 2019.