The Effect of High- and Low-Frequency Previews and Sentential Fit on Word Skipping During Reading

This source preferred by Abby Laishley and Bernhard Angele

Authors: Angele, B., Laishley, A.E., Rayner, K. and Liversedge, S.P.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21361/

Journal: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition

Volume: 40

Issue: 4

Pages: 1181-1203

ISSN: 0278-7393

DOI: 10.1037/a0036396

In a previous gaze-contingent boundary experiment, Angele and Rayner (2013) found that readers are likely to skip a word that appears to be the definite article the even when syntactic constraints do not allow for articles to occur in that position. In the present study, we investigated whether the word frequency of the preview of a 3-letter target word influences a reader’s decision to fixate or skip that word. We found that the word frequency rather than the felicitousness (syntactic fit) of the preview affected how often the upcoming word was skipped. These results indicate that visual information about the upcoming word trumps information from the sentence context when it comes to making a skipping decision. Skipping parafoveal instances of the therefore may simply be an extreme case of skipping high-frequency words.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Angele, B., Laishley, A.E., Rayner, K. and Liversedge, S.P.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21361/

Journal: J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn

Volume: 40

Issue: 4

Pages: 1181-1203

eISSN: 1939-1285

DOI: 10.1037/a0036396

In a previous gaze-contingent boundary experiment, Angele and Rayner (2013) found that readers are likely to skip a word that appears to be the definite article the even when syntactic constraints do not allow for articles to occur in that position. In the present study, we investigated whether the word frequency of the preview of a 3-letter target word influences a reader's decision to fixate or skip that word. We found that the word frequency rather than the felicitousness (syntactic fit) of the preview affected how often the upcoming word was skipped. These results indicate that visual information about the upcoming word trumps information from the sentence context when it comes to making a skipping decision. Skipping parafoveal instances of the therefore may simply be an extreme case of skipping high-frequency words.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Angele, B., Laishley, A.E., Rayner, K. and Liversedge, S.P.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21361/

Journal: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition

Volume: 40

Issue: 4

Pages: 1181-1203

ISSN: 0278-7393

DOI: 10.1037/a0036396

In a previous gaze-contingent boundary experiment, Angele and Rayner (2013) found that readers are likely to skip a word that appears to be the definite article the even when syntactic constraints do not allow for articles to occur in that position. In the present study, we investigated whether the word frequency of the preview of a 3-letter target word influences a reader's decision to fixate or skip that word. We found that the word frequency rather than the felicitousness (syntactic fit) of the preview affected how often the upcoming word was skipped. These results indicate that visual information about the upcoming word trumps information from the sentence context when it comes to making a skipping decision. Skipping parafoveal instances of the therefore may simply be an extreme case of skipping high-frequency words. © 2014 American Psychological Association.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Angele, B., Laishley, A.E., Rayner, K. and Liversedge, S.P.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21361/

Journal: JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION

Volume: 40

Issue: 4

Pages: 1181-1203

eISSN: 1939-1285

ISSN: 0278-7393

DOI: 10.1037/a0036396

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Angele, B., Laishley, A.E., Rayner, K. and Liversedge, S.P.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21361/

Journal: Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition

Volume: 40

Issue: 4

Pages: 1181-1203

eISSN: 1939-1285

ISSN: 0278-7393

In a previous gaze-contingent boundary experiment, Angele and Rayner (2013) found that readers are likely to skip a word that appears to be the definite article the even when syntactic constraints do not allow for articles to occur in that position. In the present study, we investigated whether the word frequency of the preview of a 3-letter target word influences a reader's decision to fixate or skip that word. We found that the word frequency rather than the felicitousness (syntactic fit) of the preview affected how often the upcoming word was skipped. These results indicate that visual information about the upcoming word trumps information from the sentence context when it comes to making a skipping decision. Skipping parafoveal instances of the therefore may simply be an extreme case of skipping high-frequency words.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:51 on October 15, 2018.