Why are auditory novels distracting? Contrasting the roles of novelty, violation of expectation and stimulus change

This source preferred by Jane Elsley

Authors: Parmentier, F.B.R., Elsley, J.V., Andrés, P. and Barceló, F.

Journal: Cognition

Volume: 119

Pages: 374-380

ISSN: 0010-0277

Past studies show that novel auditory stimuli, presented in the context of an otherwise repeated sound, capture participants’ attention away from a focal task, resulting in measurable behavioral distraction. Novel sounds are traditionally defined as rare and unexpected but past studies have not sought to disentangle these concepts directly. Using a cross-modal oddball task, we contrasted these aspects orthogonally by manipulating the base rate and conditional probabilities of sound events. We report for the first time that behavioral distraction does not result from a sound’s novelty per se but from the violation of the cognitive system’s expectation based on the learning of conditional probabilities and, to some extent, the occurrence of a perceptual change from one sound to another.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Parmentier, F.B.R., Elsley, J.V., Andrés, P. and Barceló, F.

Journal: Cognition

Volume: 119

Issue: 3

Pages: 374-380

eISSN: 1873-7838

DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2011.02.001

Past studies show that novel auditory stimuli, presented in the context of an otherwise repeated sound, capture participants' attention away from a focal task, resulting in measurable behavioral distraction. Novel sounds are traditionally defined as rare and unexpected but past studies have not sought to disentangle these concepts directly. Using a cross-modal oddball task, we contrasted these aspects orthogonally by manipulating the base rate and conditional probabilities of sound events. We report for the first time that behavioral distraction does not result from a sound's novelty per se but from the violation of the cognitive system's expectation based on the learning of conditional probabilities and, to some extent, the occurrence of a perceptual change from one sound to another.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Parmentier, F.B.R., Elsley, J.V., Andrés, P. and Barceló, F.

Journal: Cognition

Volume: 119

Issue: 3

Pages: 374-380

ISSN: 0010-0277

DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2011.02.001

Past studies show that novel auditory stimuli, presented in the context of an otherwise repeated sound, capture participants' attention away from a focal task, resulting in measurable behavioral distraction. Novel sounds are traditionally defined as rare and unexpected but past studies have not sought to disentangle these concepts directly. Using a cross-modal oddball task, we contrasted these aspects orthogonally by manipulating the base rate and conditional probabilities of sound events. We report for the first time that behavioral distraction does not result from a sound's novelty per se but from the violation of the cognitive system's expectation based on the learning of conditional probabilities and, to some extent, the occurrence of a perceptual change from one sound to another. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Parmentier, F.B., Elsley, J.V., Andrés, P. and Barceló, F.

Journal: Cognition

Volume: 119

Issue: 3

Pages: 374-380

eISSN: 1873-7838

ISSN: 0010-0277

Past studies show that novel auditory stimuli, presented in the context of an otherwise repeated sound, capture participants' attention away from a focal task, resulting in measurable behavioral distraction. Novel sounds are traditionally defined as rare and unexpected but past studies have not sought to disentangle these concepts directly. Using a cross-modal oddball task, we contrasted these aspects orthogonally by manipulating the base rate and conditional probabilities of sound events. We report for the first time that behavioral distraction does not result from a sound's novelty per se but from the violation of the cognitive system's expectation based on the learning of conditional probabilities and, to some extent, the occurrence of a perceptual change from one sound to another.

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