Applying research to practice: Exploring the barriers

This source preferred by Vanessa Heaslip and Jaqui Hewitt-Taylor

Authors: Hewitt-Taylor, J., Heaslip, V. and Rowe, N.

Journal: British Journal of Nursing

Volume: 21

Pages: 356-359

ISSN: 0966-0461

This source preferred by Vanessa Heaslip and Jaqui Hewitt-Taylor

Authors: Hewitt-Taylor, J., Heaslip, V. and Rowe, N.

Journal: British Journal of Nursing

Volume: 21

Pages: 356-359

ISSN: 0966-0461

Nurses are not averse to applying research findings to their clinical practice; however, there appears to be a number of barriers to achieving this. Generally, barriers include lack of time and the need to provide more education surrounding the use of research. While these are both valid points, the authors suggest that perhaps the solution to the problem is looking at how research is ‘sold’ to practitioners. For example, the use of jargon in research is off-putting to many practitioners, which creates an impression that research is associated with academia, rather than a tool for practitioners. Also, there may be an unrealistic expectation of what ‘using research’ might mean. Research is seen as the pinnacle of evidence, and not a part of evidence-based practice. In this article, the authors propose that the focus of teaching about and expectations concerning research should be on the application of research to practice, reviewing and critiquing research, and making decisions about its practical applications, rather than undertaking research or critiquing research for academic purposes.

Key words: Evidence-based practice n Evaluating research

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hewitt-Taylor, J., Heaslip, V. and Rowe, N.E.

Journal: Br J Nurs

Volume: 21

Issue: 6

Pages: 356-359

ISSN: 0966-0461

DOI: 10.12968/bjon.2012.21.6.356

Nurses are not averse to applying research findings to their clinical practice; however, there appears to be a number of barriers to achieving this. Generally, barriers include lack of time and the need to provide more education surrounding the use of research. While these are both valid points, the authors suggest that perhaps the solution to the problem is looking at how research is 'sold' to practitioners. For example, the use of jargon in research is off-putting to many practitioners, which creates an impression that research is associated with academia, rather than a tool for practitioners. Also, there may be an unrealistic expectation of what 'using research' might mean. Research is seen as the pinnacle of evidence, and not a part of evidence-based practice. In this article, the authors propose that teaching and expectations of research should focus on the application of research to practice. Reviewing and critiquing of research should serve the purpose of helping to make decisions about its practical applications, rather than for academic use.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hewitt-Taylor, J., Heaslip, V. and Rowe, N.E.

Journal: British Journal of Nursing

Volume: 21

Issue: 6

Pages: 356-359

ISSN: 0966-0461

DOI: 10.12968/bjon.2012.21.6.356

Nurses are not averse to applying research findings to their clinical practice; however, there appears to be a number of barriers to achieving this. Generally, barriers include lack of time and the need to provide more education surrounding the use of research. While these are both valid points, the authors suggest that perhaps the solution to the problem is looking at how research is 'sold' to practitioners. For example, the use of jargon in research is off-putting to many practitioners, which creates an impression that research is associated with academia, rather than a tool for practitioners. Also, there may be an unrealistic expectation of what 'using research' might mean. Research is seen as the pinnacle of evidence, and not a part of evidence-based practice. In this article, the authors propose that teaching and expectations of research should focus on the application of research to practice. Reviewing and critiquing of research should serve the purpose of helping to make decisions about its practical applications, rather than for academic use.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Hewitt-Taylor, J., Heaslip, V. and Rowe, N.E.

Journal: British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing)

Volume: 21

Issue: 6

Pages: 356-359

ISSN: 0966-0461

Nurses are not averse to applying research findings to their clinical practice; however, there appears to be a number of barriers to achieving this. Generally, barriers include lack of time and the need to provide more education surrounding the use of research. While these are both valid points, the authors suggest that perhaps the solution to the problem is looking at how research is 'sold' to practitioners. For example, the use of jargon in research is off-putting to many practitioners, which creates an impression that research is associated with academia, rather than a tool for practitioners. Also, there may be an unrealistic expectation of what 'using research' might mean. Research is seen as the pinnacle of evidence, and not a part of evidence-based practice. In this article, the authors propose that teaching and expectations of research should focus on the application of research to practice. Reviewing and critiquing of research should serve the purpose of helping to make decisions about its practical applications, rather than for academic use.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:16 on February 19, 2020.