Learning in large learning spaces: The academic engagement of a diverse group of students

This source preferred by Clive Hunt

Authors: Hunt, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/20178/

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13596748.2011.626983

Journal: Research in Post-Compulsory Education

Volume: 17

Pages: 195-205

ISSN: 1359-6748

DOI: 10.1080/13596748.2011.626983

Teaching larger groups of students is a growing phenomenon in HE and this brings with it, its own challenges not least for the students themselves but also their lecturers. Demographic factors as well as the experiences that characterise us as individuals will impact upon our ability to learn. The pilot study reported here considered the “academic engagement” of a diverse group of students where their course is delivered in large learning environments. As a pilot study, the paper concludes with the identification of two areas which are worthy of further research. Firstly, the study highlighted that mature students were more likely to engage in learning strategies that are associated with surface learning – the binary opposite to which practitioners often strive to achieve. Secondly, the research suggests that students who appear to know their tutors well indicate a preference for study approaches that are likely to develop deeper learning.

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Authors: Hunt, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/20178/

Journal: Research in Post-Compulsory Education

Volume: 17

Issue: 2

Pages: 195-205

eISSN: 1747-5112

ISSN: 1359-6748

DOI: 10.1080/13596748.2011.626983

Teaching larger groups of students is a growing phenomenon in HE and this brings with it its own challenges, not least for the students themselves but also for their lecturers. Demographic factors as well as the experiences that characterise us as individuals will impact upon our ability to learn. The pilot study reported here considered the 'academic engagement' of a diverse group of students where their course is delivered in large learning environments. As a pilot study, the paper concludes with the identification of two areas which are worthy of further research. Firstly, the study highlighted that mature students were more likely to engage in learning strategies that are associated with surface learning - the binary opposite to which practitioners often strive to achieve. Secondly, the research suggests that students who appear to know their tutors well indicate a preference for study approaches that are likely to develop deeper learning. © 2012 Copyright Further Education Research Association.

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