How do men in the United Kingdom decide to dispose of banked sperm following cancer treatment?

This source preferred by Emily Arden-Close

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Pacey, A.A., Merrick, H., Arden-Close, E., Morris, K., Tomlinson, M., Rowe, R. and Eiser, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22783/

Journal: Hum Fertil (Camb)

Volume: 17

Issue: 4

Pages: 285-288

eISSN: 1742-8149

DOI: 10.3109/14647273.2014.947333

Current policy in the UK recommends that men bank sperm prior to cancer treatment, but very few return to use it for reproductive purposes or agree to elective disposal even when their fertility recovers and their families are complete. We assessed the demographic, medical and psychological variables that influence the decision to dispose by contacting men (n = 499) who banked sperm more than five years previously, and asked them to complete questionnaires about their views on sperm banking, fertility and disposal. From 193 responses (38.7% response rate), 19 men (9.8%) requested disposal within four months of completing the questionnaire. Compared with men who wanted their sperm to remain in storage, they were significantly more confident that their fertility had recovered (OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.05-3.03, p = 0.034), saw fertility monitoring (semen analysis) as less important (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.39-0.94, p = 0.026), held more positive attitudes to disposal (OR = 5.71, 95% CI = 2.89-11.27, p < 0.001), were more likely to have experienced adverse treatment side-effects (OR = 4.37, CI = 1.61-11.85, p = 0.004) and had less desire for children in the future (OR = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.26-0.64, p < 0.001). Information about men's reasons to dispose of banked sperm may be helpful in devising new strategies to encourage men to engage with sperm banking clinics and make timely decisions about the fate of their samples.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Pacey, A.A., Merrick, H., Arden-Close, E., Morris, K., Tomlinson, M., Rowe, R. and Eiser, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22783/

Journal: Human Fertility

Volume: 17

Issue: 4

Pages: 285-288

eISSN: 1742-8149

ISSN: 1464-7273

DOI: 10.3109/14647273.2014.947333

© 2014 The British Fertility Society. Current policy in the UK recommends that men bank sperm prior to cancer treatment, but very few return to use it for reproductive purposes or agree to elective disposal even when their fertility recovers and their families are complete. We assessed the demographic, medical and psychological variables that influence the decision to dispose by contacting men (n = 499) who banked sperm more than five years previously, and asked them to complete questionnaires about their views on sperm banking, fertility and disposal. From 193 responses (38.7% response rate), 19 men (9.8%) requested disposal within four months of completing the questionnaire. Compared with men who wanted their sperm to remain in storage, they were significantly more confident that their fertility had recovered (OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.05 – 3.03, p = 0.034), saw fertility monitoring (semen analysis) as less important (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.39 – 0.94, p = 0.026), held more positive attitudes to disposal (OR = 5.71, 95% CI = 2.89 – 11.27, p = 0.001), were more likely to have experienced adverse treatment side-effects (OR = 4.37, CI = 1.61 – 11.85, p = 0.004) and had less desire for children in the future (OR = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.26 – 0.64, p = 0.001). Information about men’ s reasons to dispose of banked sperm may be helpful in devising new strategies to encourage men to engage with sperm banking clinics and make timely decisions about the fate of their samples.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Pacey, A.A., Merrick, H., Arden-Close, E., Morris, K., Tomlinson, M., Rowe, R. and Eiser, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22783/

Journal: Human fertility (Cambridge, England)

Volume: 17

Issue: 4

Pages: 285-288

eISSN: 1742-8149

ISSN: 1464-7273

Current policy in the UK recommends that men bank sperm prior to cancer treatment, but very few return to use it for reproductive purposes or agree to elective disposal even when their fertility recovers and their families are complete. We assessed the demographic, medical and psychological variables that influence the decision to dispose by contacting men (n = 499) who banked sperm more than five years previously, and asked them to complete questionnaires about their views on sperm banking, fertility and disposal. From 193 responses (38.7% response rate), 19 men (9.8%) requested disposal within four months of completing the questionnaire. Compared with men who wanted their sperm to remain in storage, they were significantly more confident that their fertility had recovered (OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.05-3.03, p = 0.034), saw fertility monitoring (semen analysis) as less important (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.39-0.94, p = 0.026), held more positive attitudes to disposal (OR = 5.71, 95% CI = 2.89-11.27, p < 0.001), were more likely to have experienced adverse treatment side-effects (OR = 4.37, CI = 1.61-11.85, p = 0.004) and had less desire for children in the future (OR = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.26-0.64, p < 0.001). Information about men's reasons to dispose of banked sperm may be helpful in devising new strategies to encourage men to engage with sperm banking clinics and make timely decisions about the fate of their samples.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:54 on March 23, 2019.