‘20 tins of Stella for a fiver’: The making of class through Labour and Coalition government alcohol policy

This source preferred by William Haydock

Authors: Haydock, W.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21547/

Journal: Capital and Class

Volume: 38

Issue: 3

Pages: 583-600

Publisher: Sage Journals

ISSN: 0309-8168

DOI: 10.1177/0309816814550455

Alcohol use in the UK has been a key concern to both the Labour and Coalition governments, and commands considerable attention in the media and academic discussions. This article analyses how recent government policy discussions have defined particular forms of drinking as problematic, and how these definitions and associated policy initiatives can be seen as part of a wider symbolic economy through which people come to be valued differently, incorporating ideas of economic, cultural and social capital. Therefore, I argue that government policies and discussions of drinking are a key way in which class is constituted in contemporary Britain.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Haydock, W.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21547/

Journal: Capital and Class

Volume: 38

Issue: 3

Pages: 583-600

eISSN: 2041-0980

ISSN: 0309-8168

DOI: 10.1177/0309816814550455

© The Author(s) 2014. Alcohol use in the UK has been a key concern to both the Labour and Coalition governments, and commands considerable attention in the media and academic discussions. This article analyses how recent government policy discussions have defined particular forms of drinking as problematic, and how these definitions and associated policy initiatives can be seen as part of a wider symbolic economy through which people come to be valued differently, incorporating ideas of economic, cultural and social capital. Therefore, I argue that government policies and discussions of drinking are a key way in which class is constituted in contemporary Britain.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:09 on February 20, 2020.