Identity adaptation is mediated and moderated by visualisation ability

This source preferred by Peter Arabaci Hills

Authors: Hills, P.J., Elward, R.L. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: Perception

Volume: 37

Pages: 1241

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hills, P.J., Elward, R.L. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: Perception

Volume: 37

Issue: 8

Pages: 1241-1257

ISSN: 0301-0066

DOI: 10.1068/p5834

Depending on the previous research one reads, face aftereffects may or may not partially transfer across viewpoints. Two experiments are reported that explore this face-identity aftereffect by varying the adaptor type. Adaptation occurs when different views of the identity are used and even when the person's name is the adaptor. Brief exposure or nationality did not produce adaptation. In a third experiment, the role of visualisation was explored. Participants with higher visualisation scores showed greater adaptation to names than those with lower scores. These findings suggest non-facial identity cues can lead to a facial adaptation effect and that visualisation may be the mechanism behind this.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hills, P.J., Elward, R.L. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: Perception

Volume: 37

Issue: 8

Pages: 1241-1257

ISSN: 0301-0066

DOI: 10.1068/p5834

Depending on the previous research one reads, face aftereffects may or may not partially transfer across viewpoints. Two experiments are reported that explore this face-identity aftereffect by varying the adaptor type. Adaptation occurs when different views of the identity are used and even when the person's name is the adaptor. Brief exposure or nationality did not produce adaptation. In a third experiment, the role of visualisation was explored. Participants with higher visualisation scores showed greater adaptation to names than those with lower scores. These findings suggest non-facial identity cues can lead to a facial adaptation effect and that visualisation may be the mechanism behind this. © 2008 a Pion publication.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Hills, P.J., Elward, R.L. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: Perception

Volume: 37

Issue: 8

Pages: 1241-1257

eISSN: 1468-4233

ISSN: 0301-0066

Depending on the previous research one reads, face aftereffects may or may not partially transfer across viewpoints. Two experiments are reported that explore this face-identity aftereffect by varying the adaptor type. Adaptation occurs when different views of the identity are used and even when the person's name is the adaptor. Brief exposure or nationality did not produce adaptation. In a third experiment, the role of visualisation was explored. Participants with higher visualisation scores showed greater adaptation to names than those with lower scores. These findings suggest non-facial identity cues can lead to a facial adaptation effect and that visualisation may be the mechanism behind this.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:57 on June 24, 2019.