‘Draw, write and tell’: A literature review and methodological development on the ‘draw and write’ research method

This source preferred by Catherine Angell

Authors: Angell, C., Hunt, J.A. and Alexander, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21745/

Journal: Early Childhood Research

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISSN: 1476-718X

DOI: 10.1177/1476718X14538592

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Angell, C., Alexander, J. and Hunt, J.A.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21745/

Journal: Journal of Early Childhood Research

Volume: 13

Issue: 1

Pages: 17-28

ISSN: 1476-718X

DOI: 10.1177/1476718X14538592

© The Author(s) 2014. The creative research method ‘draw and write’ has been used in health, social care and education research for several decades. A literature search of studies utilising this method was conducted during the planning stages of a study exploring primary school children’s perceptions of infant feeding. A review of this literature noted a range of benefits of ‘draw and write’ in enabling child participation. However, it also identified that the method has been used inconsistently and found that there are issues for researchers in relation to interpretation of creative work and analysis of data. As a result of this, an improvement on this method, entitled ‘draw, write and tell’, was developed in an attempt to provide a more child-orientated and consistent approach to data collection, interpretation and analysis. This article identifies the issues relating to ‘draw and write’ and describes the development and application of ‘draw, write and tell’ as a case study, noting its limitations and benefits.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Angell, C., Alexander, J. and Hunt, J.A.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21745/

Journal: JOURNAL OF EARLY CHILDHOOD RESEARCH

Volume: 13

Issue: 1

Pages: 17-28

eISSN: 1741-2927

ISSN: 1476-718X

DOI: 10.1177/1476718X14538592

The data on this page was last updated at 19:59 on June 9, 2020.