Lexical processing in children and adults during word copying

This source preferred by Julie Kirkby

Authors: Deng, S., Kirkby, J.A., Chang, J. and Zhang, J.J.

Journal: International Journal of Serious Games

eISSN: 2044-592X

ISSN: 2044-5911

DOI: 10.17083/ijsg.v1i4.24

The goal of this review is to illustrate the emerging use of multimodal virtual reality that can benefit learning-based games. The review begins with an introduction to multimodal virtual reality in serious games and we provide a brief discussion of why cognitive processes involved in learning and training are enhanced under immersive virtual environments. We initially outline studies that have used eye tracking and haptic feedback independently in serious games, and then review some innovative applications that have already combined eye tracking and haptic devices in order to provide applicable multimodal frameworks for learning-based games. Finally, some general conclusions are identified and clarified in order to advance current understanding in multimodal serious game production as well as exploring possible areas for new applications.

This source preferred by Abby Laishley

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Laishley, A.E., Liversedge, S.P. and Kirkby, J.A.

Journal: Journal of Cognitive Psychology

Publisher: Psychology Press Ltd

eISSN: 2044-592X

ISSN: 2044-5911

DOI: 10.1080/20445911.2014.991396

Copying text may seem trivial, but the task itself is psychologically complex. It involves a series of sequential visual and cognitive processes, which must be co-ordinated; these include visual encoding, mental representation and written production. To investigate the time course of word processing during copying, we recorded eye movements of adults and children as they hand-copied isolated words presented on a classroom board. Longer and lower frequency words extended adults' encoding durations, suggesting whole word encoding. Only children's short word encoding was extended by lower frequency. Though children spent more time encoding long words compared to short words, gaze durations for long words were extended similarly for high- and low-frequency words. This suggested that for long words children used partial word representations and encoded multiple sublexical units rather than single whole words. Piecemeal word representation underpinned copying longer words in children, but reliance on partial word representations was not shown in adult readers.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Laishley, A.E., Liversedge, S.P. and Kirkby, J.A.

Journal: JOURNAL OF COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

Volume: 27

Issue: 5

Pages: 578-593

eISSN: 2044-592X

ISSN: 2044-5911

DOI: 10.1080/20445911.2014.991396

The data on this page was last updated at 05:10 on February 17, 2020.