What ‘children’ experience and ‘adults’ may overlook: Phenomenological approaches to media practice, education and research

Authors: Woodfall, A. and Zezulkova, M.

Journal: Journal of Children and Media

Volume: 10

Issue: 1

Pages: 98-106

eISSN: 1748-2801

ISSN: 1748-2798

DOI: 10.1080/17482798.2015.1121889

Abstract:

This paper argues that each utterance of media should be seen as in dialogue with each other utterance, and that children, being the phenomenological hub to their lived media experience, should be recognised as engaging with media holistically. Argument draws upon two recent qualitative studies with children between six and eleven years of age. These studies, although separate, shared certain phenomenology orientated conceptual underpinnings and arrived at relatable findings. Notably that participating children tended to address media in a platform agnostic manner and offered little sense that they saw the media platform itself as being of overriding significance to their holistic media engagement. Ultimately, if children’s lived media engagement is dialogic and holistic, then focusing on only one discreet media utterance (like television for example) can be said to become deeply problematic to those within children’s media practice, education and research.

Source: Scopus

What 'children' experience and 'adults' may overlook: phenomenological approaches to media practice, education and research

Authors: Woodfall, A. and Zezulkova, M.

Journal: JOURNAL OF CHILDREN AND MEDIA

Volume: 10

Issue: 1

Pages: 98-106

eISSN: 1748-2801

ISSN: 1748-2798

DOI: 10.1080/17482798.2015.1121889

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

What ‘Children’ Experience and ‘Adults’ May Overlook: Phenomenological Approaches to Media Practice, Education and Research

Authors: Woodfall, A. and Zezulkova, M.

Journal: Journal of Children and Media

Volume: 10

Issue: 1

Pages: 98-106

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Abstract:

This paper argues that each utterance of media should be seen as in dialogue with each other utterance, and that children, being the phenomenological hub to their lived media experience, should be recognised as engaging with media holistically. Argument draws upon two recent qualitative studies with children between six and eleven years of age. These studies, although separate, shared certain phenomenology orientated conceptual underpinnings and arrived at relatable findings. Notably that participating children tended to address media in a platform agnostic manner and offered little sense that they saw the media platform itself as being of overriding significance to their holistic media engagement. Ultimately, if children’s lived media engagement is dialogic and holistic, then focusing on only one discreet media utterance (like television for example) can be said to become deeply problematic to those within children’s media practice, education and research.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17482798.2015.1121889

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Ashley Woodfall

What ‘children’ experience and ‘adults’ may overlook: phenomenological approaches to media practice, education and research

Authors: Woodfall, A. and Zuzelkova, M.

Journal: Journal of Children and Media

Volume: 10

Issue: 1

Pages: 98-106

ISSN: 1748-2801

Source: Manual