An Age Old Problem? Estimating the Impact of Dementia on Past Human Populations

Authors: Smith, M., Atkin, A. and Cutler, C.

Journal: Journal of Aging and Health

Volume: 29

Issue: 1

Pages: 68-98

eISSN: 1552-6887

ISSN: 0898-2643

DOI: 10.1177/0898264315624905

Abstract:

Objective: To model the impact of dementia on past societies. Method: We consider multiple lines of evidence indicating elderly individuals to have been more common throughout the past than is frequently accepted. We then apply known dementia incidence/prevalence rates to plausible assumptions of past population structures to suggest prevalence in the past. Results: Dementia prevalence in premodern societies is likely to have been around 5% of the rate seen in modern, developed countries but with a total past incidence running into billions. Discussion: Dementia is often seen as a "modern" challenge that humans have not had to contend with before. We argue that this condition has had considerably greater effects than previously envisaged and is a challenge that humans have already withstood successfully, on one hand at a lower incidence but on the other without the considerable clinical, technological, and social advances that have been made in recent times.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23257/

Source: Scopus

An Age Old Problem? Estimating the Impact of Dementia on Past Human Populations.

Authors: Smith, M., Atkin, A. and Cutler, C.

Journal: J Aging Health

Volume: 29

Issue: 1

Pages: 68-98

eISSN: 1552-6887

DOI: 10.1177/0898264315624905

Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: To model the impact of dementia on past societies. METHOD: We consider multiple lines of evidence indicating elderly individuals to have been more common throughout the past than is frequently accepted. We then apply known dementia incidence/prevalence rates to plausible assumptions of past population structures to suggest prevalence in the past. RESULTS: Dementia prevalence in premodern societies is likely to have been around 5% of the rate seen in modern, developed countries but with a total past incidence running into billions. DISCUSSION: Dementia is often seen as a "modern" challenge that humans have not had to contend with before. We argue that this condition has had considerably greater effects than previously envisaged and is a challenge that humans have already withstood successfully, on one hand at a lower incidence but on the other without the considerable clinical, technological, and social advances that have been made in recent times.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23257/

Source: PubMed

An Age Old Problem? Estimating the Impact of Dementia on Past Human Populations

Authors: Smith, M., Atkin, A. and Cutler, C.

Journal: JOURNAL OF AGING AND HEALTH

Volume: 29

Issue: 1

Pages: 68-98

eISSN: 1552-6887

ISSN: 0898-2643

DOI: 10.1177/0898264315624905

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23257/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

An age old problem? Estimating the impact of dementia on past human publications

Authors: Smith, M., Atkin, A. and Cutler, C.

Journal: Alzheimer's and Dementia

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23257/

Source: Manual

An Age Old Problem? Estimating the Impact of Dementia on Past Human Populations.

Authors: Smith, M., Atkin, A. and Cutler, C.

Journal: Journal of aging and health

Volume: 29

Issue: 1

Pages: 68-98

eISSN: 1552-6887

ISSN: 0898-2643

DOI: 10.1177/0898264315624905

Abstract:

Objective

To model the impact of dementia on past societies.

Method

We consider multiple lines of evidence indicating elderly individuals to have been more common throughout the past than is frequently accepted. We then apply known dementia incidence/prevalence rates to plausible assumptions of past population structures to suggest prevalence in the past.

Results

Dementia prevalence in premodern societies is likely to have been around 5% of the rate seen in modern, developed countries but with a total past incidence running into billions.

Discussion

Dementia is often seen as a "modern" challenge that humans have not had to contend with before. We argue that this condition has had considerably greater effects than previously envisaged and is a challenge that humans have already withstood successfully, on one hand at a lower incidence but on the other without the considerable clinical, technological, and social advances that have been made in recent times.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23257/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

An Age Old Problem? Estimating the Impact of Dementia on Past Human Populations.

Authors: Smith, M.J., Atkin, A. and Cutler, C.

Journal: Journal of Aging and Health

Volume: 29

Issue: 1

Pages: 68-98

ISSN: 0898-2643

Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: To model the impact of dementia on past societies. METHOD: We consider multiple lines of evidence indicating elderly individuals to have been more common throughout the past than is frequently accepted. We then apply known dementia incidence/prevalence rates to plausible assumptions of past population structures to suggest prevalence in the past. RESULTS: Dementia prevalence in premodern societies is likely to have been around 5% of the rate seen in modern, developed countries but with a total past incidence running into billions. DISCUSSION: Dementia is often seen as a "modern" challenge that humans have not had to contend with before. We argue that this condition has had considerably greater effects than previously envisaged and is a challenge that humans have already withstood successfully, on one hand at a lower incidence but on the other without the considerable clinical, technological, and social advances that have been made in recent times.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23257/

Source: BURO EPrints