Measuring kinematic variables in front crawl swimming using accelerometers: A validation study

Authors: Callaway, A.J.

Journal: Sensors (Switzerland)

Volume: 15

Issue: 5

Pages: 11363-11386

ISSN: 1424-8220

DOI: 10.3390/s150511363

Abstract:

Objective data on swimming performance is needed to meet the demands of the swimming coach and athlete. The purpose of this study is to use a multiple inertial measurement units to calculate Lap Time, Velocity, Stroke Count, Stroke Duration, Stroke Rate and Phases of the Stroke (Entry, Pull, Push, Recovery) in front crawl swimming. Using multiple units on the body, an algorithm was developed to calculate the phases of the stroke based on the relative position of the body roll. Twelve swimmers, equipped with these devices on the body, performed fatiguing trials. The calculated factors were compared to the same data derived to video data showing strong positive results for all factors. Four swimmers required individual adaptation to the stroke phase calculation method. The developed algorithm was developed using a search window relative to the body roll (peak/trough). This customization requirement demonstrates that single based devices will not be able to determine these phases of the stroke with sufficient accuracy.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21958/

Source: Scopus

Measuring kinematic variables in front crawl swimming using accelerometers: a validation study.

Authors: Callaway, A.J.

Journal: Sensors (Basel)

Volume: 15

Issue: 5

Pages: 11363-11386

eISSN: 1424-8220

DOI: 10.3390/s150511363

Abstract:

Objective data on swimming performance is needed to meet the demands of the swimming coach and athlete. The purpose of this study is to use a multiple inertial measurement units to calculate Lap Time, Velocity, Stroke Count, Stroke Duration, Stroke Rate and Phases of the Stroke (Entry, Pull, Push, Recovery) in front crawl swimming. Using multiple units on the body, an algorithm was developed to calculate the phases of the stroke based on the relative position of the body roll. Twelve swimmers, equipped with these devices on the body, performed fatiguing trials. The calculated factors were compared to the same data derived to video data showing strong positive results for all factors. Four swimmers required individual adaptation to the stroke phase calculation method. The developed algorithm was developed using a search window relative to the body roll (peak/trough). This customization requirement demonstrates that single based devices will not be able to determine these phases of the stroke with sufficient accuracy.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21958/

Source: PubMed

Measuring Kinematic Variables in Front Crawl Swimming Using Accelerometers: A Validation Study

Authors: Callaway, A.J.

Journal: SENSORS

Volume: 15

Issue: 5

Pages: 11363-11386

ISSN: 1424-8220

DOI: 10.3390/s150511363

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21958/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Measuring Kinematic Variables in Front Crawl Swimming Using Accelerometers: A Validation Study

Authors: Callaway, A.

Editors: Passaro, V.M.N.

Journal: Sensors

Volume: 15

Issue: 5

Pages: 11363-11386

DOI: 10.3390/s150511363

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21958/

http://www.mdpi.com/1424-8220/15/5/11363

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Andrew Callaway

Measuring kinematic variables in front crawl swimming using accelerometers: a validation study.

Authors: Callaway, A.J.

Journal: Sensors (Basel, Switzerland)

Volume: 15

Issue: 5

Pages: 11363-11386

eISSN: 1424-8220

ISSN: 1424-8220

DOI: 10.3390/s150511363

Abstract:

Objective data on swimming performance is needed to meet the demands of the swimming coach and athlete. The purpose of this study is to use a multiple inertial measurement units to calculate Lap Time, Velocity, Stroke Count, Stroke Duration, Stroke Rate and Phases of the Stroke (Entry, Pull, Push, Recovery) in front crawl swimming. Using multiple units on the body, an algorithm was developed to calculate the phases of the stroke based on the relative position of the body roll. Twelve swimmers, equipped with these devices on the body, performed fatiguing trials. The calculated factors were compared to the same data derived to video data showing strong positive results for all factors. Four swimmers required individual adaptation to the stroke phase calculation method. The developed algorithm was developed using a search window relative to the body roll (peak/trough). This customization requirement demonstrates that single based devices will not be able to determine these phases of the stroke with sufficient accuracy.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21958/

Source: Europe PubMed Central