Quantitative electroencephalography and behavioural correlates of daytime sleepiness in chronic stroke

Authors: Herron, K., Dijk, D.J., Dean, P., Seiss, E. and Sterr, A.

Journal: BioMed Research International

Volume: 2014

eISSN: 2314-6141

ISSN: 2314-6133

DOI: 10.1155/2014/794086

Abstract:

Sleepiness is common after stroke, but in contrast to its importance for rehabilitation, existing studies focus primarily on the acute state and often use subjective sleepiness measures only. We used quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) to extract physiological sleepiness, as well as subjective reports, in response to motor-cognitive demand in stroke patients and controls. We hypothesised that (a) slowing of the EEG is chronically sustained after stroke; (b) increased power in lower frequencies and increased sleepiness are associated; and (c) sleepiness is modulated by motor-cognitive demand. QEEGs were recorded in 32 chronic stroke patients and 20 controls using a Karolinska Drowsiness Test protocol administered before and after a motor priming task. Subjective sleepiness was measured using the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale. The findings showed that power density was significantly increased in delta and theta frequency bands over both hemispheres in patients which were not associated with subjective sleepiness ratings. This effect was not observed in controls. The motor priming task induced differential hemispheric effects with greater increase in low-frequency bands and presumably compensatory increases in higher frequency bands. The results indicate sustained slowing in the qEEG in chronic stroke, but in contrast to healthy controls, these changes are not related to perceived sleepiness. © 2014 Katherine Herron et al.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22348/

Source: Scopus

Quantitative electroencephalography and behavioural correlates of daytime sleepiness in chronic stroke.

Authors: Herron, K., Dijk, D.-J., Dean, P., Seiss, E. and Sterr, A.

Journal: Biomed Res Int

Volume: 2014

Pages: 794086

eISSN: 2314-6141

DOI: 10.1155/2014/794086

Abstract:

Sleepiness is common after stroke, but in contrast to its importance for rehabilitation, existing studies focus primarily on the acute state and often use subjective sleepiness measures only. We used quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) to extract physiological sleepiness, as well as subjective reports, in response to motor-cognitive demand in stroke patients and controls. We hypothesised that (a) slowing of the EEG is chronically sustained after stroke; (b) increased power in lower frequencies and increased sleepiness are associated; and (c) sleepiness is modulated by motor-cognitive demand. QEEGs were recorded in 32 chronic stroke patients and 20 controls using a Karolinska Drowsiness Test protocol administered before and after a motor priming task. Subjective sleepiness was measured using the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale. The findings showed that power density was significantly increased in delta and theta frequency bands over both hemispheres in patients which were not associated with subjective sleepiness ratings. This effect was not observed in controls. The motor priming task induced differential hemispheric effects with greater increase in low-frequency bands and presumably compensatory increases in higher frequency bands. The results indicate sustained slowing in the qEEG in chronic stroke, but in contrast to healthy controls, these changes are not related to perceived sleepiness.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22348/

Source: PubMed

Quantitative Electroencephalography and Behavioural Correlates of Daytime Sleepiness in Chronic Stroke

Authors: Herron, K., Dijk, D.-J., Dean, P., Seiss, E. and Sterr, A.

Journal: BIOMED RESEARCH INTERNATIONAL

Volume: 2014

eISSN: 2314-6141

ISSN: 2314-6133

DOI: 10.1155/2014/794086

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22348/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Quantitative electroencephalography and behavioural correlates of daytime sleepiness in chronic stroke.

Authors: Herron, K., Dijk, D.-J., Dean, P., Seiss, E. and Sterr, A.

Journal: BioMed research international

Volume: 2014

Pages: 794086

eISSN: 2314-6141

ISSN: 2314-6133

DOI: 10.1155/2014/794086

Abstract:

Sleepiness is common after stroke, but in contrast to its importance for rehabilitation, existing studies focus primarily on the acute state and often use subjective sleepiness measures only. We used quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) to extract physiological sleepiness, as well as subjective reports, in response to motor-cognitive demand in stroke patients and controls. We hypothesised that (a) slowing of the EEG is chronically sustained after stroke; (b) increased power in lower frequencies and increased sleepiness are associated; and (c) sleepiness is modulated by motor-cognitive demand. QEEGs were recorded in 32 chronic stroke patients and 20 controls using a Karolinska Drowsiness Test protocol administered before and after a motor priming task. Subjective sleepiness was measured using the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale. The findings showed that power density was significantly increased in delta and theta frequency bands over both hemispheres in patients which were not associated with subjective sleepiness ratings. This effect was not observed in controls. The motor priming task induced differential hemispheric effects with greater increase in low-frequency bands and presumably compensatory increases in higher frequency bands. The results indicate sustained slowing in the qEEG in chronic stroke, but in contrast to healthy controls, these changes are not related to perceived sleepiness.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22348/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

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