Cognitive functioning and work success in adults with dyslexia

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Leather, C., Hogh, H., Seiss, E. and Everatt, J.

Journal: Dyslexia

Volume: 17

Issue: 4

Pages: 327-338

eISSN: 1099-0909

DOI: 10.1002/dys.441

Dyslexic adults completed questionnaires designed to investigate relationships between cognitive functioning, especially executive aspects, and work success. The study was designed to determine whether quantitative support could be provided for the model of adult dyslexic success derived from the work of Gerber and his colleagues (Gerber, Ginsberg, & Reiff, 1992). A planning/metacognitive awareness scale and a cognitive failures scale were used as measures of cognitive skill. Personal success was assessed with job satisfaction and work-based self-efficacy scales, and societal success was determined by assessing the salary level, promotion in the current profession and academic qualifications. Correlational analyses indicated that people with dyslexia with higher levels of planning and metacognition reported higher levels of job satisfaction and self-efficacy. However, these measures were not related to societal success. The findings are discussed in terms of avenues for further investigation of factors leading to more positive outcomes for dyslexic individuals and ways to increase the likelihood of dyslexic adults achieving success in the workplace.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Leather, C., Hogh, H., Seiss, E. and Everatt, J.

Journal: Dyslexia

Volume: 17

Issue: 4

Pages: 327-338

eISSN: 1099-0909

ISSN: 1076-9242

DOI: 10.1002/dys.441

Dyslexic adults completed questionnaires designed to investigate relationships between cognitive functioning, especially executive aspects, and work success. The study was designed to determine whether quantitative support could be provided for the model of adult dyslexic success derived from the work of Gerber and his colleagues (Gerber, Ginsberg, & Reiff, 1992). A planning/metacognitive awareness scale and a cognitive failures scale were used as measures of cognitive skill. Personal success was assessed with job satisfaction and work-based self-efficacy scales, and societal success was determined by assessing the salary level, promotion in the current profession and academic qualifications. Correlational analyses indicated that people with dyslexia with higher levels of planning and metacognition reported higher levels of job satisfaction and self-efficacy. However, these measures were not related to societal success. The findings are discussed in terms of avenues for further investigation of factors leading to more positive outcomes for dyslexic individuals and ways to increase the likelihood of dyslexic adults achieving success in the workplace. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Leather, C., Hogh, H., Seiss, E. and Everatt, J.

Journal: DYSLEXIA

Volume: 17

Issue: 4

Pages: 327-338

eISSN: 1099-0909

ISSN: 1076-9242

DOI: 10.1002/dys.441

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Leather, C., Hogh, H., Seiss, E. and Everatt, J.

Journal: Dyslexia (Chichester, England)

Volume: 17

Issue: 4

Pages: 327-338

eISSN: 1099-0909

ISSN: 1076-9242

Dyslexic adults completed questionnaires designed to investigate relationships between cognitive functioning, especially executive aspects, and work success. The study was designed to determine whether quantitative support could be provided for the model of adult dyslexic success derived from the work of Gerber and his colleagues (Gerber, Ginsberg, & Reiff, 1992). A planning/metacognitive awareness scale and a cognitive failures scale were used as measures of cognitive skill. Personal success was assessed with job satisfaction and work-based self-efficacy scales, and societal success was determined by assessing the salary level, promotion in the current profession and academic qualifications. Correlational analyses indicated that people with dyslexia with higher levels of planning and metacognition reported higher levels of job satisfaction and self-efficacy. However, these measures were not related to societal success. The findings are discussed in terms of avenues for further investigation of factors leading to more positive outcomes for dyslexic individuals and ways to increase the likelihood of dyslexic adults achieving success in the workplace.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:31 on November 27, 2020.