Distraction, not hunger, is associated with lower mood and lower perceived work performance on fast compared to non-fast days during intermittent fasting

This source preferred by Katherine Appleton

Authors: Appleton, K.M. and Baker, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22097/

Journal: Journal of Health Psychology

Volume: 20

Issue: 6

Pages: 702-711

eISSN: 1461-7277

ISSN: 1359-1053

DOI: 10.1177/1359105315573430

© The Author(s) 2015.Using a repeated measures design, 16 females recorded hunger, distraction, mood and perceived work performance on two consecutive fast days, on two earlier and on two subsequent consecutive non-fast days, during intermittent fasting. Using regression analyses, low positive mood was associated with higher distraction (β = -0.38, p < 0.01), and lower perceived work performance was associated with higher distraction (β = -0.50, p < 0.01) and lower positive mood (β = 0.59, p = 0.01). No associations were found with hunger (largest β = -0.11, p = 0.15). Associations between mood, perceived work performance and distraction but not hunger mirror those found in traditional dieting and suggest no benefit for attention from intermittent fasting-type regimes.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Appleton, K.M. and Baker, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22097/

Journal: J Health Psychol

Volume: 20

Issue: 6

Pages: 702-711

eISSN: 1461-7277

DOI: 10.1177/1359105315573430

Using a repeated measures design, 16 females recorded hunger, distraction, mood and perceived work performance on two consecutive fast days, on two earlier and on two subsequent consecutive non-fast days, during intermittent fasting. Using regression analyses, low positive mood was associated with higher distraction (β = -0.38, p < 0.01), and lower perceived work performance was associated with higher distraction (β = -0.50, p < 0.01) and lower positive mood (β = 0.59, p = 0.01). No associations were found with hunger (largest β = -0.11, p = 0.15). Associations between mood, perceived work performance and distraction but not hunger mirror those found in traditional dieting and suggest no benefit for attention from intermittent fasting-type regimes.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Appleton, K.M. and Baker, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22097/

Journal: Journal of Health Psychology

Volume: 20

Issue: 6

Pages: 702-711

eISSN: 1461-7277

ISSN: 1359-1053

DOI: 10.1177/1359105315573430

© The Author(s) 2015. Using a repeated measures design, 16 females recorded hunger, distraction, mood and perceived work performance on two consecutive fast days, on two earlier and on two subsequent consecutive non-fast days, during intermittent fasting. Using regression analyses, low positive mood was associated with higher distraction (β = -0.38, p < 0.01), and lower perceived work performance was associated with higher distraction (β = -0.50, p < 0.01) and lower positive mood (β = 0.59, p = 0.01). No associations were found with hunger (largest β = -0.11, p = 0.15). Associations between mood, perceived work performance and distraction but not hunger mirror those found in traditional dieting and suggest no benefit for attention from intermittent fasting-type regimes.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Appleton, K.M. and Baker, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22097/

Journal: JOURNAL OF HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY

Volume: 20

Issue: 6

Pages: 702-711

eISSN: 1461-7277

ISSN: 1359-1053

DOI: 10.1177/1359105315573430

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Appleton, K.M. and Baker, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22097/

Journal: Journal of health psychology

Volume: 20

Issue: 6

Pages: 702-711

eISSN: 1461-7277

ISSN: 1359-1053

Using a repeated measures design, 16 females recorded hunger, distraction, mood and perceived work performance on two consecutive fast days, on two earlier and on two subsequent consecutive non-fast days, during intermittent fasting. Using regression analyses, low positive mood was associated with higher distraction (β = -0.38, p < 0.01), and lower perceived work performance was associated with higher distraction (β = -0.50, p < 0.01) and lower positive mood (β = 0.59, p = 0.01). No associations were found with hunger (largest β = -0.11, p = 0.15). Associations between mood, perceived work performance and distraction but not hunger mirror those found in traditional dieting and suggest no benefit for attention from intermittent fasting-type regimes.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:56 on March 21, 2019.