Visualising future behaviour: Effects for snacking on biscuit bars, but no effects for snacking on fruit

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Adams, C., Rennie, L., Uskul, A.K. and Appleton, K.M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22386/

Journal: J Health Psychol

Volume: 20

Issue: 8

Pages: 1037-1048

eISSN: 1461-7277

DOI: 10.1177/1359105313506760

In this study, participants (N = 223) were randomised to visualise snacking on fruit, visualise snacking on biscuit bars or no visualisation, and intentions and attitudes towards fruit and biscuit bars, immediate selection of fruit or biscuit bars and subsequent consumption were measured. No effects of visualising snacking on fruit were found once background variables were taken into account. Visualising snacking on biscuit bars, however, resulted in greater intentions to consume biscuit bars (smallest β = 0.19, p < 0.01). These findings suggest that specifics of the visualised target behaviour may be important in visualisation. Further investigation is needed before recommending visualisation for increasing fruit consumption.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Adams, C., Rennie, L., Uskul, A.K. and Appleton, K.M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22386/

Journal: Journal of Health Psychology

Volume: 20

Issue: 8

Pages: 1037-1048

eISSN: 1461-7277

ISSN: 1359-1053

DOI: 10.1177/1359105313506760

© The Author(s) 2013. In this study, participants (N = 223) were randomised to visualise snacking on fruit, visualise snacking on biscuit bars or no visualisation, and intentions and attitudes towards fruit and biscuit bars, immediate selection of fruit or biscuit bars and subsequent consumption were measured. No effects of visualising snacking on fruit were found once background variables were taken into account. Visualising snacking on biscuit bars, however, resulted in greater intentions to consume biscuit bars (smallest β = 0.19, p < 0.01). These findings suggest that specifics of the visualised target behaviour may be important in visualisation. Further investigation is needed before recommending visualisation for increasing fruit consumption.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Adams, C., Rennie, L., Uskul, A.K. and Appleton, K.M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22386/

Journal: JOURNAL OF HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY

Volume: 20

Issue: 8

Pages: 1037-1048

eISSN: 1461-7277

ISSN: 1359-1053

DOI: 10.1177/1359105313506760

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Adams, C., Rennie, L., Uskul, A.K. and Appleton, K.M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22386/

Journal: Journal of health psychology

Volume: 20

Issue: 8

Pages: 1037-1048

eISSN: 1461-7277

ISSN: 1359-1053

In this study, participants (N = 223) were randomised to visualise snacking on fruit, visualise snacking on biscuit bars or no visualisation, and intentions and attitudes towards fruit and biscuit bars, immediate selection of fruit or biscuit bars and subsequent consumption were measured. No effects of visualising snacking on fruit were found once background variables were taken into account. Visualising snacking on biscuit bars, however, resulted in greater intentions to consume biscuit bars (smallest β = 0.19, p < 0.01). These findings suggest that specifics of the visualised target behaviour may be important in visualisation. Further investigation is needed before recommending visualisation for increasing fruit consumption.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:58 on May 27, 2019.