The effects of perceived and received support on self-confidence

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Rees, T. and Freeman, P.

Journal: J Sports Sci

Volume: 25

Issue: 9

Pages: 1057-1065

ISSN: 0264-0414

DOI: 10.1080/02640410600982279

A sample of 222 university athletes (mean age 19.8 years, s = 2.0), ranging in standard from university second team to international competitor, completed a measure of perceived support 2 weeks before an important competition or match. On the day before the competition or match, the athletes completed measures of stressors, stress, received support, and self-confidence. Moderated hierarchical regression analyses revealed the following key findings: (i) main effects for both perceived (DeltaR2 = 0.11) and received support (DeltaR2 = 0.14) upon self-confidence; (ii) stress-buffering effects for both perceived (DeltaR2 = 0.02) and received (DeltaR2 = 0.07) support upon self-confidence; (iii) when both aspects of support were considered simultaneously, stress-buffering effects were primarily attributable to the influence of received support. These results demonstrate the beneficial impact of social support on self-confidence, both directly and by reducing the negative effect of stress on self-confidence. Our findings emphasize the need to recognize the distinction between perceived and received support, both in terms of theory and the design of social support interventions with athletes.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Rees, T. and Freeman, P.

Journal: Journal of Sports Sciences

Volume: 25

Issue: 9

Pages: 1057-1065

eISSN: 1466-447X

ISSN: 0264-0414

DOI: 10.1080/02640410600982279

A sample of 222 university athletes (mean age 19.8 years, s = 2.0), ranging in standard from university second team to international competitor, completed a measure of perceived support 2 weeks before an important competition or match. On the day before the competition or match, the athletes completed measures of stressors, stress, received support, and self-confidence. Moderated hierarchical regression analyses revealed the following key findings: (i) main effects for both perceived (ΔR2 = 0.11) and received support (ΔR2 = 0.14) upon self-confidence; (ii) stress-buffering effects for both perceived (ΔR2 = 0.02) and received (ΔR2 = 0.07) support upon self-confidence; (iii) when both aspects of support were considered simultaneously, stress-buffering effects were primarily attributable to the influence of received support. These results demonstrate the beneficial impact of social support on self-confidence, both directly and by reducing the negative effect of stress on self-confidence. Our findings emphasize the need to recognize the distinction between perceived and received support, both in terms of theory and the design of social support interventions with athletes.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Rees, T. and Freeman, P.

Journal: JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES

Volume: 25

Issue: 9

Pages: 1057-1065

ISSN: 0264-0414

DOI: 10.1080/02640410600982279

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Rees, T. and Freeman, P.

Journal: Journal of sports sciences

Volume: 25

Issue: 9

Pages: 1057-1065

eISSN: 1466-447X

ISSN: 0264-0414

A sample of 222 university athletes (mean age 19.8 years, s = 2.0), ranging in standard from university second team to international competitor, completed a measure of perceived support 2 weeks before an important competition or match. On the day before the competition or match, the athletes completed measures of stressors, stress, received support, and self-confidence. Moderated hierarchical regression analyses revealed the following key findings: (i) main effects for both perceived (DeltaR2 = 0.11) and received support (DeltaR2 = 0.14) upon self-confidence; (ii) stress-buffering effects for both perceived (DeltaR2 = 0.02) and received (DeltaR2 = 0.07) support upon self-confidence; (iii) when both aspects of support were considered simultaneously, stress-buffering effects were primarily attributable to the influence of received support. These results demonstrate the beneficial impact of social support on self-confidence, both directly and by reducing the negative effect of stress on self-confidence. Our findings emphasize the need to recognize the distinction between perceived and received support, both in terms of theory and the design of social support interventions with athletes.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:09 on February 24, 2020.