Stressors, social support, and effects upon performance in golf

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Rees, T., Hardy, L. and Freeman, P.

Journal: J Sports Sci

Volume: 25

Issue: 1

Pages: 33-42

ISSN: 0264-0414

DOI: 10.1080/02640410600702974

In this study, we extended the work of Rees and Hardy (2004) by examining the main and stress-buffering effects of social support upon sports performance in a different context, using a different outcome measure, and a specific time-frame. A high-level performance sample of 117 male golfers (mean age 24.8, s = 8.3) completed measures of social support and stressors before competitions. Performance outcome was recorded. Moderated hierarchical regression analyses revealed significant (P < 0.05) main effects for stressors upon performance in 8 of the 11 models tested (R2 = 0.08 - 0.21). Over and above the variance accounted for by stressors, there were significant (P < 0.05) main effects for social support upon performance in all models tested (DeltaR2 = 0.10 - 0.24). In all models, stressors were associated with worse performance, whereas social support was associated with better performance. There were no significant interactions (stress-buffering effects). Main effects for social support upon performance suggest that social support may have aided performance directly, regardless of the level of stress.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Rees, T., Hardy, L. and Freeman, P.

Journal: Journal of Sports Sciences

Volume: 25

Issue: 1

Pages: 33-42

eISSN: 1466-447X

ISSN: 0264-0414

DOI: 10.1080/02640410600702974

In this study, we extended the work of Rees and Hardy (2004) by examining the main and stress-buffering effects of social support upon sports performance in a different context, using a different outcome measure, and a specific time-frame. A high-level performance sample of 117 male golfers (mean age 24.8, s = 8.3) completed measures of social support and stressors before competitions. Performance outcome was recorded. Moderated hierarchical regression analyses revealed significant (P < 0.05) main effects for stressors upon performance in 8 of the 11 models tested (R2 = 0.08 - 0.21). Over and above the variance accounted for by stressors, there were significant (P < 0.05) main effects for social support upon performance in all models tested (ΔR2 = 0.10 - 0.24). In all models, stressors were associated with worse performance, whereas social support was associated with better performance. There were no significant interactions (stress-buffering effects). Main effects for social support upon performance suggest that social support may have aided performance directly, regardless of the level of stress.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Rees, T., Hardy, L. and Freeman, P.

Journal: JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES

Volume: 25

Issue: 1

Pages: 33-42

ISSN: 0264-0414

DOI: 10.1080/02640410600702974

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Rees, T., Hardy, L. and Freeman, P.

Journal: Journal of sports sciences

Volume: 25

Issue: 1

Pages: 33-42

eISSN: 1466-447X

ISSN: 0264-0414

In this study, we extended the work of Rees and Hardy (2004) by examining the main and stress-buffering effects of social support upon sports performance in a different context, using a different outcome measure, and a specific time-frame. A high-level performance sample of 117 male golfers (mean age 24.8, s = 8.3) completed measures of social support and stressors before competitions. Performance outcome was recorded. Moderated hierarchical regression analyses revealed significant (P < 0.05) main effects for stressors upon performance in 8 of the 11 models tested (R2 = 0.08 - 0.21). Over and above the variance accounted for by stressors, there were significant (P < 0.05) main effects for social support upon performance in all models tested (DeltaR2 = 0.10 - 0.24). In all models, stressors were associated with worse performance, whereas social support was associated with better performance. There were no significant interactions (stress-buffering effects). Main effects for social support upon performance suggest that social support may have aided performance directly, regardless of the level of stress.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:13 on February 22, 2020.