Examination of the Validity of the Social Support Survey Using Confirmatory Factor Analysis

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Rees, T., Hardy, L., Ingledew, D.K. and Evans, L.

Journal: Res Q Exerc Sport

Volume: 71

Issue: 4

Pages: 322-330

ISSN: 0270-1367

DOI: 10.1080/02701367.2000.10608915

The Social Support Survey (SSS), validated by Richman, Rosenfeld, and Hardy (1993), is a multidimensional self-report measure of social support tested with student athletes. The SSS contains eight dimensions of support. For each dimension of support the same four questions are posed. The SSS could, therefore, be scored in two ways: (a) to derive a score for the support dimensions; (b) to derive a score for the questions posed across all eight support dimensions. Confirmatory factor analyses of the SSS on 416 university athletes revealed poor fits to models for both the eight support dimensions and the four questions across all eight dimensions. This problem was clarified by using a multitrait-multimethod model, which led to improved model fit but revealed that most of the SSS items were two-dimensional. Caution should, therefore, be exercised in using the SSS as a measure of multidimensional social support.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Rees, T., Hardy, L., Ingledew, D.K. and Evans, L.

Journal: Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Volume: 71

Issue: 4

Pages: 322-330

ISSN: 0270-1367

DOI: 10.1080/02701367.2000.10608915

The Social Support Survey (SSS), validated by Richman, Rosenfeld, and Hardy (1993), is a multidimensional self-report measure of social support tested with student athletes. The SSS contains eight dimensions of support. For each dimension of support the same four questions are posed. The SSS could, therefore, be scored in two ways: (a) to derive a score for the support dimensions; (b) to derive a score for the questions posed across all eight support dimensions. Confirmatory factor analyses of the SSS on 416 university athletes revealed poor fits to models for both the eight support dimensions and the four questions across all eight dimensions. This problem was clarified by using a multitrait-multimethod model, which led to improved model fit but revealed that most of the SSS items were two-dimensional. Caution should, therefore, be exercised in using the SSS as a measure of multidimensional social support.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Rees, T., Hardy, L., Ingledew, D.K. and Evans, L.

Journal: RESEARCH QUARTERLY FOR EXERCISE AND SPORT

Volume: 71

Issue: 4

Pages: 322-330

ISSN: 0270-1367

DOI: 10.1080/02701367.2000.10608915

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Rees, T., Hardy, L., Ingledew, D.K. and Evans, L.

Journal: Research quarterly for exercise and sport

Volume: 71

Issue: 4

Pages: 322-330

eISSN: 2168-3824

ISSN: 0270-1367

The Social Support Survey (SSS), validated by Richman, Rosenfeld, and Hardy (1993), is a multidimensional self-report measure of social support tested with student athletes. The SSS contains eight dimensions of support. For each dimension of support the same four questions are posed. The SSS could, therefore, be scored in two ways: (a) to derive a score for the support dimensions; (b) to derive a score for the questions posed across all eight support dimensions. Confirmatory factor analyses of the SSS on 416 university athletes revealed poor fits to models for both the eight support dimensions and the four questions across all eight dimensions. This problem was clarified by using a multitrait-multimethod model, which led to improved model fit but revealed that most of the SSS items were two-dimensional. Caution should, therefore, be exercised in using the SSS as a measure of multidimensional social support.

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