The development of a measure of psychological responses to injury

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Evans, L., Hardy, L., Mitchell, I. and Rees, T.

Journal: J Sport Rehabil

Volume: 17

Issue: 1

Pages: 21-37

ISSN: 1056-6716

DOI: 10.1123/jsr.17.1.21

OBJECTIVE: The current paper reports the initial development of a theoretically derived measure to assess the psychological responses of injured athletes. DESIGN: The paper comprises two studies. The first examines the factorial validity of the Psychological Responses to Sport Injury Inventory (PRSII) originally reported by Evans, Hardy, and Mullen.1 The second reexamines the factorial validity of the PRSII following scale refinement. Confirmatory factor analysis was employed in both studies. SETTING: Sport injury clinics. PARTICIPANTS: Study 1 comprised repeated observations (n=486) on 56 injured athletes. Study 2 comprised single observations on 418 injured athletes. MEASURE: Psychological Responses to Sport Injury Inventory (PRSII). RESULTS: The five factor model from the first study demonstrated variable model fit. The six factor model that emerged from the second study showed improved model fit. CONCLUSIONS: The study provides some support for the PRSII as a measure of athletes' psychological responses to injury.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Evans, L., Hardy, L., Mitchell, I. and Rees, T.

Journal: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation

Volume: 17

Issue: 1

Pages: 21-37

eISSN: 1543-3072

ISSN: 1056-6716

DOI: 10.1123/jsr.17.1.21

Objective: The current paper reports the initial development of a theoretically derived measure to assess the psychological responses of injured athletes. Design: The paper comprises two studies. The first examines the factorial validity of the Psychological Responses to Sport Injury Inventory (PRSII) originally reported by Evans, Hardy, and Mullen.1 The second reexamines the factorial validity of the PRSII following scale refinement. Confirmatory factor analysis was employed in both studies. Setting: Sport injury clinics. Participants: Study 1 comprised repeated observations (n = 486) on 56 injured athletes. Study 2 comprised single observations on 418 injured athletes. Measure: Psychological Responses to Sport Injury Inventory (PRSII). Results: The five factor model from the first study demonstrated variable model fit. The six factor model that emerged from the second study showed improved model fit. Conclusions: The study provides some support for the PRSII as a measure of athletes' psychological responses to injury.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Evans, L., Hardy, L., Mitchell, I. and Rees, T.

Journal: JOURNAL OF SPORT REHABILITATION

Volume: 17

Issue: 1

Pages: 21-37

eISSN: 1543-3072

ISSN: 1056-6716

DOI: 10.1123/jsr.17.1.21

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Evans, L., Hardy, L., Mitchell, I. and Rees, T.

Journal: Journal of sport rehabilitation

Volume: 17

Issue: 1

Pages: 21-37

eISSN: 1543-3072

ISSN: 1056-6716

OBJECTIVE: The current paper reports the initial development of a theoretically derived measure to assess the psychological responses of injured athletes. DESIGN: The paper comprises two studies. The first examines the factorial validity of the Psychological Responses to Sport Injury Inventory (PRSII) originally reported by Evans, Hardy, and Mullen.1 The second reexamines the factorial validity of the PRSII following scale refinement. Confirmatory factor analysis was employed in both studies. SETTING: Sport injury clinics. PARTICIPANTS: Study 1 comprised repeated observations (n=486) on 56 injured athletes. Study 2 comprised single observations on 418 injured athletes. MEASURE: Psychological Responses to Sport Injury Inventory (PRSII). RESULTS: The five factor model from the first study demonstrated variable model fit. The six factor model that emerged from the second study showed improved model fit. CONCLUSIONS: The study provides some support for the PRSII as a measure of athletes' psychological responses to injury.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:09 on February 24, 2020.