When the chips are down: Effects of attributional feedback on self-efficacy and task performance following initial and repeated failure

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Coffee, P. and Rees, T.

Journal: J Sports Sci

Volume: 29

Issue: 3

Pages: 235-245

eISSN: 1466-447X

DOI: 10.1080/02640414.2010.531752

In two experiments, we manipulated the controllability and stability of causes of failure and explored the impact of these factors on self-efficacy and performance. In Experiment 1, participants (N=80; mean age 20.0 years, s=1.0) were provided with false negative feedback following performance on a blindfolded dart-throwing task. Consistent with theory and recent research, an induced belief that failure was beyond control and unlikely to change led to lower self-efficacy and poorer performance (all F1,754>5.49, all P<0.05, all η2=0.01). A second experiment (N=80; mean age 22.0 years, s=2.1) demonstrated that following an induced belief that failure was beyond control and unlikely to change, only new perceptions that a repeated failure was within one's control and likely to change resulted in higher self-efficacy and improved performance (all F1,75>4.53, all P<0.05, all η2>0.004). All effects were mediated by self-efficacy: Sobel's (1982) test, all z>1.97 (in absolute magnitude), all P<0.05, all r>0.22 (in absolute magnitude). These findings suggest that in novel circumstances individuals believe in the best for themselves unless possibilities to self-enhance are explicitly precluded, and only reinvest efforts when opportunities for self-enhancement become clearly admissible.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Coffee, P. and Rees, T.

Journal: Journal of Sports Sciences

Volume: 29

Issue: 3

Pages: 235-245

eISSN: 1466-447X

ISSN: 0264-0414

DOI: 10.1080/02640414.2010.531752

In two experiments, we manipulated the controllability and stability of causes of failure and explored the impact of these factors on self-efficacy and performance. In Experiment 1, participants (N=80; mean age 20.0 years, s=1.0) were provided with false negative feedback following performance on a blindfolded dart-throwing task. Consistent with theory and recent research, an induced belief that failure was beyond control and unlikely to change led to lower self-efficacy and poorer performance (all F1,75>5.49, all P<0.05, all η2=0.01). A second experiment (N=80; mean age 22.0 years, s=2.1) demonstrated that following an induced belief that failure was beyond control and unlikely to change, only new perceptions that a repeated failure was within one's control and likely to change resulted in higher self-efficacy and improved performance (all F1,75>4.53, all P<0.05, all η2>0.004). All effects were mediated by self-efficacy: Sobel's (1982) test, all z>1.97 (in absolute magnitude), all P<0.05, all r>0.22 (in absolute magnitude). These findings suggest that in novel circumstances individuals believe in the best for themselves unless possibilities to self-enhance are explicitly precluded, and only reinvest efforts when opportunities for self-enhancement become clearly admissible. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Coffee, P. and Rees, T.

Journal: JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES

Volume: 29

Issue: 3

Pages: 235-245

ISSN: 0264-0414

DOI: 10.1080/02640414.2010.531752

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Coffee, P. and Rees, T.

Journal: Journal of sports sciences

Volume: 29

Issue: 3

Pages: 235-245

eISSN: 1466-447X

ISSN: 0264-0414

In two experiments, we manipulated the controllability and stability of causes of failure and explored the impact of these factors on self-efficacy and performance. In Experiment 1, participants (N=80; mean age 20.0 years, s=1.0) were provided with false negative feedback following performance on a blindfolded dart-throwing task. Consistent with theory and recent research, an induced belief that failure was beyond control and unlikely to change led to lower self-efficacy and poorer performance (all F1,754>5.49, all P<0.05, all η2=0.01). A second experiment (N=80; mean age 22.0 years, s=2.1) demonstrated that following an induced belief that failure was beyond control and unlikely to change, only new perceptions that a repeated failure was within one's control and likely to change resulted in higher self-efficacy and improved performance (all F1,75>4.53, all P<0.05, all η2>0.004). All effects were mediated by self-efficacy: Sobel's (1982) test, all z>1.97 (in absolute magnitude), all P<0.05, all r>0.22 (in absolute magnitude). These findings suggest that in novel circumstances individuals believe in the best for themselves unless possibilities to self-enhance are explicitly precluded, and only reinvest efforts when opportunities for self-enhancement become clearly admissible.

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