Bouncing back from failure: The interactive impact of perceived controllability and stability on self-efficacy beliefs and future task performance

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Coffee, P., Rees, T. and Haslam, S.A.

Journal: J Sports Sci

Volume: 27

Issue: 11

Pages: 1117-1124

ISSN: 0264-0414

DOI: 10.1080/02640410903030297

There is limited empirical evidence of the relationship between attributions following failure and subsequent task performance. Two studies manipulated the perceived controllability and stability of causes of initial task failure and explored the impact of these factors on perceptions of self-efficacy and follow-up performance. Consistent with previous attributional and social identity theorizing, an induced belief that failure was both beyond control and unlikely to change led to lower self-efficacy and worse performance, relative to conditions in which outcomes were believed to be controllable and/or unstable. These findings point to the resilience of beliefs in personal self-efficacy, but suggest that where opportunities for self-enhancement are precluded, personal self-belief will be compromised and performance will suffer.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Coffee, P., Rees, T. and Haslam, S.A.

Journal: Journal of Sports Sciences

Volume: 27

Issue: 11

Pages: 1117-1124

eISSN: 1466-447X

ISSN: 0264-0414

DOI: 10.1080/02640410903030297

There is limited empirical evidence of the relationship between attributions following failure and subsequent task performance. Two studies manipulated the perceived controllability and stability of causes of initial task failure and explored the impact of these factors on perceptions of self-efficacy and follow-up performance. Consistent with previous attributional and social identity theorizing, an induced belief that failure was both beyond control and unlikely to change led to lower self-efficacy and worse performance, relative to conditions in which outcomes were believed to be controllable and/or unstable. These findings point to the resilience of beliefs in personal self-efficacy, but suggest that where opportunities for self-enhancement are precluded, personal self-belief will be compromised and performance will suffer. © 2009 Taylor & Francis.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Coffee, P., Rees, T. and Haslam, S.A.

Journal: JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES

Volume: 27

Issue: 11

Pages: 1117-1124

ISSN: 0264-0414

DOI: 10.1080/02640410903030297

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Coffee, P., Rees, T. and Haslam, S.A.

Journal: Journal of sports sciences

Volume: 27

Issue: 11

Pages: 1117-1124

eISSN: 1466-447X

ISSN: 0264-0414

There is limited empirical evidence of the relationship between attributions following failure and subsequent task performance. Two studies manipulated the perceived controllability and stability of causes of initial task failure and explored the impact of these factors on perceptions of self-efficacy and follow-up performance. Consistent with previous attributional and social identity theorizing, an induced belief that failure was both beyond control and unlikely to change led to lower self-efficacy and worse performance, relative to conditions in which outcomes were believed to be controllable and/or unstable. These findings point to the resilience of beliefs in personal self-efficacy, but suggest that where opportunities for self-enhancement are precluded, personal self-belief will be compromised and performance will suffer.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:12 on February 26, 2020.