The Science of Meditation and the State of Hypnosis

This source preferred by Jane Holroyd

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Holroyd, J.

Journal: Am J Clin Hypn

Volume: 46

Issue: 2

Pages: 109-128

ISSN: 0002-9157

DOI: 10.1080/00029157.2003.10403582

Two aspects of Buddhist meditation--concentration and mindfulness--are discussed in relationship to hypnosis. Mindfulness training facilitates the investigation of subjective responses to hypnosis. Concentration practice leads to altered states similar to those in hypnosis, both phenomenologically and neurologically. The similarities and differences between hypnosis and meditation are used to shed light on perennial questions: (1) Does hypnosis involve an altered state of consciousness? (2) Does a hypnotic induction increase suggestibility? I conclude that a model for hypnosis should include altered states as well as capacity for imaginative involvement and expectations.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Holroyd, J.

Journal: American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

Volume: 46

Issue: 2

Pages: 109-128

eISSN: 2160-0562

ISSN: 0002-9157

DOI: 10.1080/00029157.2003.10403582

Two aspects of Buddhist meditation—concentration and mindfulness—are discussed in relationship to hypnosis. Mindfulness training facilitates the investigation of subjective responses to hypnosis. Concentration practice leads to altered states similar to those in hypnosis, both phenomenologically and neurologically. The similarities and differences between hypnosis and meditation are used to shed light on perennial questions: (1) Does hypnosis involve an altered state of consciousness? (2) Does a hypnotic induction increase suggestibility? I conclude that a model for hypnosis should include altered states as well as capacity for imaginative involvement and ex pectations. © 2003 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Holroyd, J.

Journal: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL HYPNOSIS

Volume: 46

Issue: 2

Pages: 109-128

ISSN: 0002-9157

DOI: 10.1080/00029157.2003.10403582

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Holroyd, J.

Journal: The American journal of clinical hypnosis

Volume: 46

Issue: 2

Pages: 109-128

eISSN: 2160-0562

ISSN: 0002-9157

Two aspects of Buddhist meditation--concentration and mindfulness--are discussed in relationship to hypnosis. Mindfulness training facilitates the investigation of subjective responses to hypnosis. Concentration practice leads to altered states similar to those in hypnosis, both phenomenologically and neurologically. The similarities and differences between hypnosis and meditation are used to shed light on perennial questions: (1) Does hypnosis involve an altered state of consciousness? (2) Does a hypnotic induction increase suggestibility? I conclude that a model for hypnosis should include altered states as well as capacity for imaginative involvement and expectations.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:17 on May 25, 2020.