Greater fruit selection following an appearance-based compared with a health-based health promotion poster

Authors: Appleton, K.M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22650/

Journal: Journal of Public Health

Volume: 38

Issue: 4

Pages: 731-738

ISSN: 1741-3842

DOI: 10.1093/pubmed/fdv147

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Appleton, K.M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22650/

Journal: J Public Health (Oxf)

eISSN: 1741-3850

DOI: 10.1093/pubmed/fdv147

BACKGROUND: This study investigated the impact of an appearance-based compared with a traditional health-based public health message for healthy eating. METHODS: A total of 166 British University students (41 males; aged 20.6 ± 1.9 years) were randomized to view either an appearance-based (n = 82) or a health-based (n = 84) fruit promotion poster. Intentions to consume fruit and immediate fruit selection (laboratory observation) were assessed immediately after poster viewing, and subsequent self-report fruit consumption was assessed 3 days later. RESULTS: Intentions to consume fruit were not predicted by poster type (largest β = 0.03, P = 0.68) but were associated with fruit-based liking, past consumption, attitudes and social norms (smallest β = 0.16, P = 0.04). Immediate fruit selection was greater following the appearance-based compared with the health-based poster (β = -0.24, P < 0.01), and this effect remained when controlling for participant characteristics (β = -0.21, P < 0.01). Subsequent fruit consumption was greater following the appearance-based compared with the health-based poster (β = -0.22, P = 0.03), but this effect became non-significant on consideration of participant characteristics (β = -0.15, P = 0.13), and was instead associated with fruit-based liking and past consumption (smallest β = 0.24, P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate the clear value of an appearance-based compared with a health-based health promotion poster for increasing fruit selection. A distinction between outcome measures and the value of a behavioural measure is also demonstrated.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Appleton, K.M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22650/

Journal: Journal of Public Health (United Kingdom)

Volume: 38

Issue: 4

Pages: 731-738

eISSN: 1741-3850

ISSN: 1741-3842

DOI: 10.1093/pubmed/fdv147

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. Background: This study investigated the impact of an appearance-based compared with a traditional health-based public health message for healthy eating. Methods: A total of 166 British University students (41 males; aged 20.6 ± 1.9 years) were randomized to view either an appearance-based (n = 82) or a health-based (n = 84) fruit promotion poster. Intentions to consume fruit and immediate fruit selection (laboratory observation) were assessed immediately after poster viewing, and subsequent self-report fruit consumption was assessed 3 days later. Results: Intentions to consume fruit were not predicted by poster type (largest β = 0.03, P = 0.68) but were associated with fruit-based liking, past consumption, attitudes and social norms (smallest β = 0.16, P = 0.04). Immediate fruit selection was greater following the appearance-based compared with the health-based poster (β = -0.24, P < 0.01), and this effect remained when controlling for participant characteristics (β = -0.21, P < 0.01). Subsequent fruit consumption was greater following the appearance-based compared with the health-based poster (β = -0.22, P = 0.03), but this effect became non-significant on consideration of participant characteristics (β = -0.15, P = 0.13), and was instead associated with fruit-based liking and past consumption (smallest β = 0.24, P = 0.03). Conclusions: These findings demonstrate the clear value of an appearance-based compared with a health-based health promotion poster for increasing fruit selection. A distinction between outcome measures and the value of a behavioural measure is also demonstrated.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Appleton, K.M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22650/

Journal: JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Volume: 38

Issue: 4

Pages: 731-738

eISSN: 1741-3850

ISSN: 1741-3842

DOI: 10.1093/pubmed/fdv147

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Appleton, K.M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22650/

Journal: Journal of public health (Oxford, England)

eISSN: 1741-3850

ISSN: 1741-3842

This study investigated the impact of an appearance-based compared with a traditional health-based public health message for healthy eating.A total of 166 British University students (41 males; aged 20.6 ± 1.9 years) were randomized to view either an appearance-based (n = 82) or a health-based (n = 84) fruit promotion poster. Intentions to consume fruit and immediate fruit selection (laboratory observation) were assessed immediately after poster viewing, and subsequent self-report fruit consumption was assessed 3 days later.Intentions to consume fruit were not predicted by poster type (largest β = 0.03, P = 0.68) but were associated with fruit-based liking, past consumption, attitudes and social norms (smallest β = 0.16, P = 0.04). Immediate fruit selection was greater following the appearance-based compared with the health-based poster (β = -0.24, P < 0.01), and this effect remained when controlling for participant characteristics (β = -0.21, P < 0.01). Subsequent fruit consumption was greater following the appearance-based compared with the health-based poster (β = -0.22, P = 0.03), but this effect became non-significant on consideration of participant characteristics (β = -0.15, P = 0.13), and was instead associated with fruit-based liking and past consumption (smallest β = 0.24, P = 0.03).These findings demonstrate the clear value of an appearance-based compared with a health-based health promotion poster for increasing fruit selection. A distinction between outcome measures and the value of a behavioural measure is also demonstrated.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:56 on March 21, 2019.