Personality, Risk Perception, Benefit Sought and Terrorism Effect

Authors: Morakabati, Y. and Kapuściński, G.

Journal: International Journal of Tourism Research

Volume: 18

Issue: 5

Pages: 506-514

eISSN: 1522-1970

ISSN: 1099-2340

DOI: 10.1002/jtr.2068

Abstract:

Risk perception can affect travel decision-making. It is subjective and variable among different people. The purposes of this study are threefold: it examines the relationship between personality and risk perception, risk perception and benefit sought and finally tests to see whether willingness to travel alters after a terrorist attack and how this differs across different personalities. To do this, a random sample of 475 British households was selected to facilitate the analysis. The findings show that there are differences in terms of people's personality and risk perception. Benefit sought and risk perceptions are partially related, but not in the context of terrorism attacks in seaside resorts, where terrorism creates an atmosphere of uncertainty that leave the door open for fear, and the lack of ability to control the risk stops even the most confident traveller. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23067/

Source: Scopus

Personality, Risk Perception, Benefit Sought and Terrorism Effect

Authors: Morakabati, Y. and Kapuscinski, G.

Journal: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TOURISM RESEARCH

Volume: 18

Issue: 5

Pages: 506-514

eISSN: 1522-1970

ISSN: 1099-2340

DOI: 10.1002/jtr.2068

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23067/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Personality, Risk Perception, Benefit Sought and Terrorism Effect

Authors: Morakabati, Y. and Kapuscinski, G.

Journal: International Journal of Tourism Research

Abstract:

Risk perception can affect travel decision-making. It is subjective and variable among different people. The purposes of this study are threefold: it examines the relationship between personality and risk perception, risk perception and benefit sought and finally tests to see whether willingness to travel alters after a terrorist attack and how this differs across different personalities. To do this, a random sample of 475 British households was selected to facilitate the analysis. The findings show that there are differences in terms of people's personality and risk perception. Benefit sought and risk perceptions are partially related, but not in the context of terrorism attacks in seaside resorts, where terrorism creates an atmosphere of uncertainty that leave the door open for fear, and the lack of ability to control the risk stops even the most confident traveller.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23067/

Source: Manual

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