Parasitism as a Driver of Trophic Niche Specialisation

Authors: Britton, J. and Andreou, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23292/

Journal: Trends in Parasitology

ISSN: 1471-5007

The population trophic niche of free-living species can be subdivided into smaller niches composed of individuals specialising on specific food items. The roles of parasites in creating these specialised sub-groups remain unclear. Intra-population differences in parasite infections can develop from specialist individuals within populations. Their differences in morphology and habitat can increase their exposure to intermediate hosts via infected prey, altering their parasite fauna. However, we also suggest that parasite infections can drive this niche specialisation. Through mechanisms including parasite manipulation, altered host phenotypes and/ or parasite-mediated competition, parasites can alter the resource availability of their hosts, altering their trophic niches. Thus, trophic niche specialisations could result from parasitism via varying influences on host traits, raising questions for future research.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Britton, J.R. and Andreou, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23292/

Journal: Trends Parasitol

Volume: 32

Issue: 6

Pages: 437-445

eISSN: 1471-5007

DOI: 10.1016/j.pt.2016.02.007

The population trophic niche of free-living species can be subdivided into smaller niches comprising individuals specialising on specific food items. The roles of parasites in creating these specialised subgroups remain unclear. Intrapopulation differences in parasite infections can develop from specialist individuals within populations. Their differences in morphology and habitat can increase their exposure to intermediate hosts via infected prey, altering their parasite fauna. However, we also suggest that parasite infections can drive this niche specialisation. Through mechanisms including parasite manipulation, altered host phenotypes, and/ or parasite-mediated competition, parasites can alter the resource availability of their hosts, altering their trophic niches. Thus, trophic niche specialisations could result from parasitism via varying influences on host traits, raising questions for future research.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Britton, J.R. and Andreou, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23292/

Journal: Trends in Parasitology

Volume: 32

Issue: 6

Pages: 437-445

eISSN: 1471-5007

ISSN: 1471-4922

DOI: 10.1016/j.pt.2016.02.007

© 2016 The Authors. The population trophic niche of free-living species can be subdivided into smaller niches comprising individuals specialising on specific food items. The roles of parasites in creating these specialised subgroups remain unclear. Intrapopulation differences in parasite infections can develop from specialist individuals within populations. Their differences in morphology and habitat can increase their exposure to intermediate hosts via infected prey, altering their parasite fauna. However, we also suggest that parasite infections can drive this niche specialisation. Through mechanisms including parasite manipulation, altered host phenotypes, and/ or parasite-mediated competition, parasites can alter the resource availability of their hosts, altering their trophic niches. Thus, trophic niche specialisations could result from parasitism via varying influences on host traits, raising questions for future research.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Britton, J.R. and Andreou, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23292/

Journal: TRENDS IN PARASITOLOGY

Volume: 32

Issue: 6

Pages: 437-445

eISSN: 1471-5007

ISSN: 1471-4922

DOI: 10.1016/j.pt.2016.02.007

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Britton, J.R. and Andreou, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23292/

Journal: Trends in parasitology

Volume: 32

Issue: 6

Pages: 437-445

eISSN: 1471-5007

ISSN: 1471-4922

The population trophic niche of free-living species can be subdivided into smaller niches comprising individuals specialising on specific food items. The roles of parasites in creating these specialised subgroups remain unclear. Intrapopulation differences in parasite infections can develop from specialist individuals within populations. Their differences in morphology and habitat can increase their exposure to intermediate hosts via infected prey, altering their parasite fauna. However, we also suggest that parasite infections can drive this niche specialisation. Through mechanisms including parasite manipulation, altered host phenotypes, and/ or parasite-mediated competition, parasites can alter the resource availability of their hosts, altering their trophic niches. Thus, trophic niche specialisations could result from parasitism via varying influences on host traits, raising questions for future research.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:18 on July 20, 2019.