Prevalence of Low Back Pain (LBP) in rotary wing aviation pilots

This source preferred by Sharon Docherty

Authors: Cunningham, L.K., Docherty, S. and Tyler, A.W.

Journal: AVIATION SPACE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE

Volume: 81

Issue: 8

Pages: 774-778

ISSN: 0095-6562

DOI: 10.3357/ASEM.2736.2010

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Cunningham, L.K., Docherty, S. and Tyler, A.W.

Journal: Aviat Space Environ Med

Volume: 81

Issue: 8

Pages: 774-778

ISSN: 0095-6562

DOI: 10.3357/asem.2736.2010

INTRODUCTION: The high prevalence of low back pain (LBP) in helicopter pilots has been well documented, although the reason behind it remains unclear. To date, little research exists comparing the Royal Air Force (RAF) to civilian pilots. METHODS: A questionnaire inquiring into participant demographics, flying experience, and back pain was distributed to RAF pilots based at units around the United Kingdom and civilian pilots working for groups such as Air Ambulance and Her Majesty's Coastguards. RESULTS: RAF pilots were significantly younger than civilian pilots (mean age 38.9 +/- 8.8 yr and 47.1 +/- 9.2 yr, respectively) and had been flying for a mode length of 6-10 yr compared with +26 yr in civilian pilots. Of civilian pilots, 40% had previously served as a pilot in the military. Neither RAF (83%) nor civilian (81%) pilots were significantly more likely to suffer from LBP and the nature of the pain experienced was similar. There were 33% of RAF and 55% of civilian pilots who used a back support. DISCUSSION: The high prevalence of back pain reported by civilian and RAF pilots may be due to several factors. To investigate this further would require responses from a greater number of civilian pilots, particularly those who do not have previous military experience. In the meantime, further use of lumbar support may go some of the way to alleviating the problem.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Cunningham, L.K., Docherty, S. and Tyler, A.W.

Journal: Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine

Volume: 81

Issue: 8

Pages: 774-778

ISSN: 0095-6562

DOI: 10.3357/ASEM.2736.2010

Introduction: The high prevalence of low back pain (LBP) in helicopter pilots has been well documented, although the reason behind it remains unclear. To date, little research exists comparing the Royal Air Force (RAF) to civilian pilots. Methods: A questionnaire inquiring into participant demographics, flying experience, and back pain was distributed to RAF pilots based at units around the United Kingdom and civilian pilots working for groups such as Air Ambulance and Her Majesty's Coastguards. Results: RAF pilots were significantly younger than civilian pilots (mean age 38.9 ± 8.8 yr and 47.1 ± 9.2 yr, respectively) and had been flying for a mode length of 6-10 yr compared with +26 yr in civilian pilots. Of civilian pilots, 40% had previously served as a pilot in the military. Neither RAF (83%) nor civilian (81%) pilots were significantly more likely to suffer from LBP and the nature of the pain experienced was similar. There were 33% of RAF and 55% of civilian pilots who used a back support. Discussion: The high prevalence of back pain reported by civilian and RAF pilots may be due to several factors. To investigate this further would require responses from a greater number of civilian pilots, particularly those who do not have previous military experience. In the meantime, further use of lumbar support may go some of the way to alleviating the problem. Copyright © by the Aerospace Medical Association.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Cunningham, L.K., Docherty, S. and Tyler, A.W.

Journal: AVIATION SPACE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE

Volume: 81

Issue: 8

Pages: 774-778

eISSN: 1943-4448

ISSN: 0095-6562

DOI: 10.3357/ASEM.2736.2010

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Cunningham, L.K., Docherty, S. and Tyler, A.W.

Journal: Aviation, space, and environmental medicine

Volume: 81

Issue: 8

Pages: 774-778

eISSN: 1943-4448

ISSN: 0095-6562

INTRODUCTION: The high prevalence of low back pain (LBP) in helicopter pilots has been well documented, although the reason behind it remains unclear. To date, little research exists comparing the Royal Air Force (RAF) to civilian pilots. METHODS: A questionnaire inquiring into participant demographics, flying experience, and back pain was distributed to RAF pilots based at units around the United Kingdom and civilian pilots working for groups such as Air Ambulance and Her Majesty's Coastguards. RESULTS: RAF pilots were significantly younger than civilian pilots (mean age 38.9 +/- 8.8 yr and 47.1 +/- 9.2 yr, respectively) and had been flying for a mode length of 6-10 yr compared with +26 yr in civilian pilots. Of civilian pilots, 40% had previously served as a pilot in the military. Neither RAF (83%) nor civilian (81%) pilots were significantly more likely to suffer from LBP and the nature of the pain experienced was similar. There were 33% of RAF and 55% of civilian pilots who used a back support. DISCUSSION: The high prevalence of back pain reported by civilian and RAF pilots may be due to several factors. To investigate this further would require responses from a greater number of civilian pilots, particularly those who do not have previous military experience. In the meantime, further use of lumbar support may go some of the way to alleviating the problem.

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