Loss of genetic integrity and biological invasions result from stocking and introductions of Barbus barbus: Insights from rivers in England

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Antognazza, C.M., Andreou, D., Zaccara, S. and Britton, R.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23207/

Journal: Ecol Evol

Volume: 6

Issue: 5

Pages: 1280-1292

ISSN: 2045-7758

DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1906

Anthropogenic activities, including the intentional releases of fish for enhancing populations (stocking), are recognized as adversely impacting the adaptive potential of wild populations. Here, the genetic characteristics of European barbel Barbus barbus were investigated using 18 populations in England, where it is indigenous to eastern-flowing rivers and where stocking has been used to enhance these populations. Invasive populations are also present in western-flowing rivers following introductions of translocated fish. Two genetic clusters were evident in the indigenous range, centered on catchments in northeast and southeast England. However, stocking activities, including the release of hatchery-reared fish, have significantly reduced the genetic differentiation across the majority of this range. In addition, in smaller indigenous rivers, populations appeared to mainly comprise fish of hatchery origin. In the nonindigenous range, genetic data largely aligned to historical stocking records, corroborating information that one particular river (Kennet) in southeast England was the original source of most invasive B. barbus in England. It is recommended that these genetic outputs inform management measures to either restore or maintain the original genetic diversity of the indigenous rivers, as this should help ensure populations can maintain their ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Where stocking is considered necessary, it is recommended that only broodstock from within the catchment is used.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Antognazza, C.M., Andreou, D., Zaccara, S. and Britton, R.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23207/

Journal: Ecology and Evolution

Volume: 6

Issue: 5

Pages: 1280-1292

eISSN: 2045-7758

DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1906

© 2016 Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Anthropogenic activities, including the intentional releases of fish for enhancing populations (stocking), are recognized as adversely impacting the adaptive potential of wild populations. Here, the genetic characteristics of European barbel Barbus barbus were investigated using 18 populations in England, where it is indigenous to eastern-flowing rivers and where stocking has been used to enhance these populations. Invasive populations are also present in western-flowing rivers following introductions of translocated fish. Two genetic clusters were evident in the indigenous range, centered on catchments in northeast and southeast England. However, stocking activities, including the release of hatchery-reared fish, have significantly reduced the genetic differentiation across the majority of this range. In addition, in smaller indigenous rivers, populations appeared to mainly comprise fish of hatchery origin. In the nonindigenous range, genetic data largely aligned to historical stocking records, corroborating information that one particular river (Kennet) in southeast England was the original source of most invasive B. barbus in England. It is recommended that these genetic outputs inform management measures to either restore or maintain the original genetic diversity of the indigenous rivers, as this should help ensure populations can maintain their ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Where stocking is considered necessary, it is recommended that only broodstock from within the catchment is used.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Antognazza, C.M., Andreou, D., Zaccara, S. and Britton, R.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23207/

Journal: Ecology and Evolution

eISSN: 2045-7758

DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1906

© 2016 The Authors. Anthropogenic activities, including the intentional releases of fish for enhancing populations (stocking), are recognized as adversely impacting the adaptive potential of wild populations. Here, the genetic characteristics of European barbel Barbus barbus were investigated using 18 populations in England, where it is indigenous to eastern-flowing rivers and where stocking has been used to enhance these populations. Invasive populations are also present in western-flowing rivers following introductions of translocated fish. Two genetic clusters were evident in the indigenous range, centered on catchments in northeast and southeast England. However, stocking activities, including the release of hatchery-reared fish, have significantly reduced the genetic differentiation across the majority of this range. In addition, in smaller indigenous rivers, populations appeared to mainly comprise fish of hatchery origin. In the nonindigenous range, genetic data largely aligned to historical stocking records, corroborating information that one particular river (Kennet) in southeast England was the original source of most invasive B. barbus in England. It is recommended that these genetic outputs inform management measures to either restore or maintain the original genetic diversity of the indigenous rivers, as this should help ensure populations can maintain their ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Where stocking is considered necessary, it is recommended that only broodstock from within the catchment is used.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Antognazza, C.M., Andreou, D., Zaccara, S. and Britton, R.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23207/

Journal: ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION

Volume: 6

Issue: 5

Pages: 1280-1292

ISSN: 2045-7758

DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1906

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Antognazza, C.M., Andreou, D., Zaccara, S. and Britton, R.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23207/

Journal: Ecology and evolution

Volume: 6

Issue: 5

Pages: 1280-1292

eISSN: 2045-7758

Anthropogenic activities, including the intentional releases of fish for enhancing populations (stocking), are recognized as adversely impacting the adaptive potential of wild populations. Here, the genetic characteristics of European barbel Barbus barbus were investigated using 18 populations in England, where it is indigenous to eastern-flowing rivers and where stocking has been used to enhance these populations. Invasive populations are also present in western-flowing rivers following introductions of translocated fish. Two genetic clusters were evident in the indigenous range, centered on catchments in northeast and southeast England. However, stocking activities, including the release of hatchery-reared fish, have significantly reduced the genetic differentiation across the majority of this range. In addition, in smaller indigenous rivers, populations appeared to mainly comprise fish of hatchery origin. In the nonindigenous range, genetic data largely aligned to historical stocking records, corroborating information that one particular river (Kennet) in southeast England was the original source of most invasive B. barbus in England. It is recommended that these genetic outputs inform management measures to either restore or maintain the original genetic diversity of the indigenous rivers, as this should help ensure populations can maintain their ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Where stocking is considered necessary, it is recommended that only broodstock from within the catchment is used.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:54 on April 18, 2019.