Electrical stimulation treatment for facial palsy after revision pleomorphic adenoma surgery.

Authors: Goldie, S., Sandeman, J., Cole, R., Dennis, S. and Swain, I.

Journal: J Surg Case Rep

Volume: 2016

Issue: 4

ISSN: 2042-8812

DOI: 10.1093/jscr/rjw057

Abstract:

Surgery for pleomorphic adenoma recurrence presents a significant risk of facial nerve damage that can result in facial weakness effecting patients' ability to communicate, mental health and self-image. We report two case studies that had marked facial weakness after resection of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma and their progress with electrical stimulation. Subjects received electrical stimulation twice daily for 24 weeks during which photographs of expressions, facial measurements and Sunnybrook scores were recorded. Both subjects recovered good facial function demonstrating Sunnybrook scores of 54 and 64 that improved to 88 and 96, respectively. Neither subjects demonstrated adverse effects of treatment. We conclude that electrical stimulation is a safe treatment and may improve facial palsy in patients after resection of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma. Larger studies would be difficult to pursue due to the low incidence of cases.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24895/

Source: PubMed

Electrical stimulation treatment for facial palsy after revision pleomorphic adenoma surgery

Authors: Goldie, S., Sandeman, J., Cole, R., Dennis, S. and Swain, I.

Journal: JOURNAL OF SURGICAL CASE REPORTS

Issue: 4

ISSN: 2042-8812

DOI: 10.1093/jscr/rjw057

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24895/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Electrical stimulation treatment for facial palsy after revision pleomorphic adenoma surgery.

Authors: Goldie, S., Sandeman, J., Cole, R., Dennis, S. and Swain, I.

Journal: Journal of surgical case reports

Volume: 2016

Issue: 4

eISSN: 2042-8812

ISSN: 2042-8812

DOI: 10.1093/jscr/rjw057

Abstract:

Surgery for pleomorphic adenoma recurrence presents a significant risk of facial nerve damage that can result in facial weakness effecting patients' ability to communicate, mental health and self-image. We report two case studies that had marked facial weakness after resection of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma and their progress with electrical stimulation. Subjects received electrical stimulation twice daily for 24 weeks during which photographs of expressions, facial measurements and Sunnybrook scores were recorded. Both subjects recovered good facial function demonstrating Sunnybrook scores of 54 and 64 that improved to 88 and 96, respectively. Neither subjects demonstrated adverse effects of treatment. We conclude that electrical stimulation is a safe treatment and may improve facial palsy in patients after resection of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma. Larger studies would be difficult to pursue due to the low incidence of cases.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24895/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Electrical stimulation treatment for facial palsy after revision pleomorphic adenoma surgery.

Authors: Goldie, S., Sandeman, J., Cole, R., Dennis, S. and Swain, I.D.

Journal: Journal of Surgical Case Reports

Volume: 2016

Issue: 4

ISSN: 2042-8812

Abstract:

Surgery for pleomorphic adenoma recurrence presents a significant risk of facial nerve damage that can result in facial weakness effecting patients' ability to communicate, mental health and self-image. We report two case studies that had marked facial weakness after resection of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma and their progress with electrical stimulation. Subjects received electrical stimulation twice daily for 24 weeks during which photographs of expressions, facial measurements and Sunnybrook scores were recorded. Both subjects recovered good facial function demonstrating Sunnybrook scores of 54 and 64 that improved to 88 and 96, respectively. Neither subjects demonstrated adverse effects of treatment. We conclude that electrical stimulation is a safe treatment and may improve facial palsy in patients after resection of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma. Larger studies would be difficult to pursue due to the low incidence of cases.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24895/

Source: BURO EPrints