Re-identification attacks-A systematic literature review

Authors: Henriksen-Bulmer, J. and Jeary, Sheridan, D.

Editors: Fitzgerald, S. and Hill, P, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24762/

Journal: International Journal of Information Management

ISSN: 1873-4707

The publication of increasing amounts of anonymised open source data has resulted in a worryingly rising number of successful re-identification attacks. This has a number of privacy and security implications both on an individual and corporate level.

This paper uses a Systematic Literature Review to investigate the depth and extent of this problem as reported in peer reviewed literature. Using a detailed protocol ,seven research portals were explored, 10,873 database entries were searched, from which a subset of 220 papers were selected for further review. From this total, 55 papers were selected as being within scope and to be included in the final review.

The main review findings are that 72.7% of all successful re-identification attacks have taken place since 2009. Most attacks use multiple datasets. The majority of them have taken place on global datasets such as social networking data, and have been conducted by US based researchers. Furthermore, the number of datasets can be used as an attribute.

Because privacy breaches have security, policy and legal implications (e.g. data protection, Safe Harbor etc.), the work highlights the need for new and improved anonymisation techniques or indeed, a fresh approach to open source publishing.

This data was imported from DBLP:

Authors: Henriksen-Bulmer, J. and Jeary, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24762/

Journal: Int J. Information Management

Volume: 36

Pages: 1184-1192

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Henriksen-Bulmer, J. and Jeary, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24762/

Journal: International Journal of Information Management

Volume: 36

Issue: 6

Pages: 1184-1192

ISSN: 0268-4012

DOI: 10.1016/j.ijinfomgt.2016.08.002

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd The publication of increasing amounts of anonymised open source data has resulted in a worryingly rising number of successful re-identification attacks. This has a number of privacy and security implications both on an individual and corporate level. This paper uses a systematic literature review to investigate the depth and extent of this problem as reported in peer reviewed literature. Using a detailed protocol,seven research portals were explored, 10,873 database entries were searched, from which a subset of 220 papers were selected for further review. From this total, 55 papers were selected as being within scope and to be included in the final review. The main review findings are that 72.7% of all successful re-identification attacks have taken place since 2009. Most attacks use multiple datasets. The majority of them have taken place on global datasets such as social networking data, and have been conducted by US based researchers. Furthermore, the number of datasets can be used as an attribute. Because privacy breaches have security, policy and legal implications (e.g. data protection, Safe Harbor etc.), the work highlights the need for new and improved anonymisation techniques or indeed, a fresh approach to open source publishing.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Henriksen-Bulmer, J. and Jeary, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24762/

Journal: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

Volume: 36

Issue: 6

Pages: 1184-1192

eISSN: 1873-4707

ISSN: 0268-4012

DOI: 10.1016/j.ijinfomgt.2016.08.002

The data on this page was last updated at 04:51 on February 23, 2019.