Management of long term sickness absence: A systematic realist review

Authors: Higgins, A., O'Halloran, P. and Porter, S.

Journal: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation

Volume: 22

Issue: 3

Pages: 322-332

DOI: 10.1007/s10926-012-9362-4

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Higgins, A., O'Halloran, P. and Porter, S.

Journal: J Occup Rehabil

Volume: 22

Issue: 3

Pages: 322-332

eISSN: 1573-3688

DOI: 10.1007/s10926-012-9362-4

PURPOSE: The increasing impact and costs of long term sickness absence have been well documented. However, the diversity and complexity of interventions and of the contexts in which these take place makes a traditional review problematic. Therefore, we undertook a systematic realist review to identify the dominant programme theories underlying best practice, to assess the evidence for these theories, and to throw light on important enabling or disabling contextual factors. METHOD: A search of the scholarly literature from 1950 to 2011 identified 5,576 articles, of which 269 formed the basis of the review. RESULTS: We found that the dominant programme theories in relation to effective management related to: early intervention or referral by employers; having proactive organisational procedures; good communication and cooperation between stakeholders; and workplace-based occupational rehabilitation. Significant contextual factors were identified as the level of support for interventions from top management, the size and structure of the organisation, the level of financial and organisational investment in the management of long-term sickness absence, and the quality of relationships between managers and staff. CONCLUSIONS: Consequently, those with responsibility for managing absence should bear in mind the contextual factors that are likely to have an impact on interventions, and do what they can to ensure stakeholders have at least a mutual understanding (if not a common purpose) in relation to their perceptions of interventions, goals, culture and practice in the management of long term sickness absence.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Higgins, A., O'Halloran, P. and Porter, S.

Journal: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation

Volume: 22

Issue: 3

Pages: 322-332

ISSN: 1053-0487

DOI: 10.1007/s10926-012-9362-4

Purpose The increasing impact and costs of long term sickness absence have been well documented. However, the diversity and complexity of interventions and of the contexts in which these take place makes a traditional review problematic. Therefore, we undertook a systematic realist review to identify the dominant programme theories underlying best practice, to assess the evidence for these theories, and to throw light on important enabling or disabling contextual factors. Method A search of the scholarly literature from 1950 to 2011 identified 5,576 articles, of which 269 formed the basis of the review. Results We found that the dominant programme theories in relation to effective management related to: early intervention or referral by employers; having proactive organisational procedures; good communication and cooperation between stakeholders; and workplace-based occupational rehabilitation. Significant contextual factors were identified as the level of support for interventions from top management, the size and structure of the organisation, the level of financial and organisational investment in the management of long-term sickness absence, and the quality of relationships between managers and staff. Conclusions Consequently, those with responsibility for managing absence should bear in mind the contextual factors that are likely to have an impact on interventions, and do what they can to ensure stakeholders have at least a mutual understanding (if not a common purpose) in relation to their perceptions of interventions, goals, culture and practice in the management of long term sickness absence. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Higgins, A., O'Halloran, P. and Porter, S.

Journal: Journal of occupational rehabilitation

Volume: 22

Issue: 3

Pages: 322-332

eISSN: 1573-3688

ISSN: 1053-0487

PURPOSE: The increasing impact and costs of long term sickness absence have been well documented. However, the diversity and complexity of interventions and of the contexts in which these take place makes a traditional review problematic. Therefore, we undertook a systematic realist review to identify the dominant programme theories underlying best practice, to assess the evidence for these theories, and to throw light on important enabling or disabling contextual factors. METHOD: A search of the scholarly literature from 1950 to 2011 identified 5,576 articles, of which 269 formed the basis of the review. RESULTS: We found that the dominant programme theories in relation to effective management related to: early intervention or referral by employers; having proactive organisational procedures; good communication and cooperation between stakeholders; and workplace-based occupational rehabilitation. Significant contextual factors were identified as the level of support for interventions from top management, the size and structure of the organisation, the level of financial and organisational investment in the management of long-term sickness absence, and the quality of relationships between managers and staff. CONCLUSIONS: Consequently, those with responsibility for managing absence should bear in mind the contextual factors that are likely to have an impact on interventions, and do what they can to ensure stakeholders have at least a mutual understanding (if not a common purpose) in relation to their perceptions of interventions, goals, culture and practice in the management of long term sickness absence.

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