Why teach sociology? A contribution to the debate

Authors: Porter, S.

Journal: Nurse Education Today

Volume: 16

Issue: 3

Pages: 170-174

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Porter, S.

Journal: Nurse Educ Today

Volume: 16

Issue: 3

Pages: 170-174

ISSN: 0260-6917

DOI: 10.1016/s0260-6917(96)80019-0

This paper seeks to engage in the debate about the role of sociology in nurse education that has been conducted in the pages of Nurse Education Today by Hannah Cooke (1993) and Keith Sharp (1995). Cooke's paper is addressed first. It is argued that in her application to nursing of Foucauldian notions of power, Cooke inflates the salience of power to the development of holistic care. In doing do, she diverts her argument away from the central problematic of her paper, namely her identification of critical structural approaches as being essential to nursing sociology. Cooke's conclusions on this issue are defended against the attack made upon them by Sharp. First, it is contended that Sharp's argument that the multiparadigmatic nature of sociology means that it cannot act as a guide for nurses is self-contradictory. Second, it is argued that his characterization of nursing work as essentially instrumental is misguided, in that the prosecution of holistic care entails a more reflexive form of action. Finally, it is posited that his interpretation of Cooke's perspective as narrow political vision is unsustainable.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Porter, S.

Journal: Nurse Education Today

Volume: 16

Issue: 3

Pages: 170-174

ISSN: 0260-6917

DOI: 10.1016/S0260-6917(96)80019-0

This paper seeks to engage in the debate about the role of sociology in nurse education that has been conducted in the pages of Nurse Education Today by Hannah Cooke (1993) and Keith Sharp (1995). Cooke's paper is addressed first. It is argued that in her application to nursing of Foucauldian notions of power, Cooke inflates the salience of power to the development of holistic care. In doing do, she diverts her argument away from the central problematic of her paper, namely her identification of critical structural approaches as being essential to nursing sociology. Cooke's conclusions on this issue are defended against the attack made upon them by Sharp. First, it is contended that Sharp's argument that the multiparadigmatic nature of sociology means that it cannot act as a guide for nurses is self-contradictory. Second, it is argued that his characterization of nursing work as essentially instrumental is misguided, in that the prosecution of holistic care entails a more reflexive form of action. Finally, it is posited that his interpretation of Cooke's perspective as narrow political vision is unsustainable. © 1996 Pearson Professional Ltd.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Porter, S.

Journal: Nurse education today

Volume: 16

Issue: 3

Pages: 170-174

eISSN: 1532-2793

ISSN: 0260-6917

This paper seeks to engage in the debate about the role of sociology in nurse education that has been conducted in the pages of Nurse Education Today by Hannah Cooke (1993) and Keith Sharp (1995). Cooke's paper is addressed first. It is argued that in her application to nursing of Foucauldian notions of power, Cooke inflates the salience of power to the development of holistic care. In doing do, she diverts her argument away from the central problematic of her paper, namely her identification of critical structural approaches as being essential to nursing sociology. Cooke's conclusions on this issue are defended against the attack made upon them by Sharp. First, it is contended that Sharp's argument that the multiparadigmatic nature of sociology means that it cannot act as a guide for nurses is self-contradictory. Second, it is argued that his characterization of nursing work as essentially instrumental is misguided, in that the prosecution of holistic care entails a more reflexive form of action. Finally, it is posited that his interpretation of Cooke's perspective as narrow political vision is unsustainable.

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