Sociology and the nursing curriculum: a defence

Authors: Porter, S.

Journal: Journal of advanced nursing

Volume: 21

Issue: 6

Pages: 1130-1135

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Porter, S.

Journal: J Adv Nurs

Volume: 21

Issue: 6

Pages: 1130-1135

ISSN: 0309-2402

DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2648.1995.21061130.x

This paper is a response to Keith Sharp's (1994) argument in the Journal of Advanced Nursing that sociology cannot in principle provide a knowledge base for nursing work. The aim here is to reassert the appropriateness of including sociology in the nursing curriculum. Three arguments put forward by Sharp are engaged with. First, he questions nursing's need for any theoretical basis at all. This hypothesis is rejected on the grounds that any occupation that is involved in complex decision-making requires some sort of theoretical guidance. Second, Sharp argues that the multi-paradigmatic nature of sociology makes it inappropriate for nurses who require more certain knowledge as a basis for their actions. Two responses to this argument are made: first, that the fissures within sociology are not as great as Sharp portrays them and, second, that nurses possess adequate criteria to be able to judge between different sociological propositions. Sharp's final argument is that the reflexive approach of sociology is an inappropriate way of thinking for nurses, whose approach is instrumental. In reply, it is noted that Sharp's instrumental model of nursing action does not adequately reflect the manner in which nurses interact with patients, and that 'new nursing' practices require reflexivity on the part of the nurse.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Porter, S.

Journal: Journal of Advanced Nursing

Volume: 21

Issue: 6

Pages: 1130-1135

eISSN: 1365-2648

ISSN: 0309-2402

DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2648.1995.21061130.x

This paper is a response to Keith Sharp's (1994) argument in the Journal of Advanced Nursing that sociology cannot in principle provide a knowledge base for nursing work The aim here is to reassert the appropriateness of including sociology in the nursing curriculum Three arguments put forward by Sharp are engaged with First, he questions nursing's need for any theoretical basis at all This hypothesis is rejected on the grounds that any occupation that is involved in complex decision‐making requires some sort of theoretical guidance Second, Sharp argues that the multi‐paradigmatic nature of sociology makes it inappropriate for nurses who require more certain knowledge as a basis for their‐actions Two responses to this argument are made first, that the fissures within sociology are not as great as Sharp portrays them and, second, that nurses possess adequate criteria to be able to judge between different sociological propositions Sharp's final argument is that the reflexive approach of sociology is an inappropriate way of thinking for nurses, whose approach is instrumental In reply, it is noted that Sharp's instrumental model of nursing action does not adequately reflect the manner in which nurses interact with patients, and that ‘new nursing’ practices require reflexivity on the part of the nurse Copyright © 1995, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Porter, S.

Journal: Journal of advanced nursing

Volume: 21

Issue: 6

Pages: 1130-1135

eISSN: 1365-2648

ISSN: 0309-2402

This paper is a response to Keith Sharp's (1994) argument in the Journal of Advanced Nursing that sociology cannot in principle provide a knowledge base for nursing work. The aim here is to reassert the appropriateness of including sociology in the nursing curriculum. Three arguments put forward by Sharp are engaged with. First, he questions nursing's need for any theoretical basis at all. This hypothesis is rejected on the grounds that any occupation that is involved in complex decision-making requires some sort of theoretical guidance. Second, Sharp argues that the multi-paradigmatic nature of sociology makes it inappropriate for nurses who require more certain knowledge as a basis for their actions. Two responses to this argument are made: first, that the fissures within sociology are not as great as Sharp portrays them and, second, that nurses possess adequate criteria to be able to judge between different sociological propositions. Sharp's final argument is that the reflexive approach of sociology is an inappropriate way of thinking for nurses, whose approach is instrumental. In reply, it is noted that Sharp's instrumental model of nursing action does not adequately reflect the manner in which nurses interact with patients, and that 'new nursing' practices require reflexivity on the part of the nurse.

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