The effect of external medium composition on membrane water permeability of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

Authors: Adams, S.L., Zhang, T. and Rawson, D.M.

Journal: Theriogenology

Volume: 64

Issue: 7

Pages: 1591-1602

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Adams, S.L., Zhang, T. and Rawson, D.M.

Journal: Theriogenology

Volume: 64

Issue: 7

Pages: 1591-1602

ISSN: 0093-691X

DOI: 10.1016/j.theriogenology.2005.03.018

The effect of external medium composition on chorion and plasma membrane permeability of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos was investigated in this study. Initially, survival of embryos spawned into varying strengths (10-40%) of Hank's solution (HBSS) was assessed. Development and hatching rates for embryos spawned into 30% and 40% HBSS were significantly lower than those obtained with embryos spawned into system water. The effect of embryo survival in 30% HBSS with different calcium levels was then investigated. Embryo survival in calcium free 30% HBSS or 30% HBSS with 10x the standard calcium concentration was similar to survival in standard 30% HBSS. Membrane water permeability was determined by measuring the floatation time of embryos in test solutions made up with heavy water (D2O) instead of deionized water. Intact embryos at early developmental stages were less permeable than later stages irrespective of the external medium that they were spawned into. In system water, the floatation time of embryos at one-cell and two-cell stages were 1323+/-83 and 1189+/-55 s, respectively, compared to 432+/-6 and 353+/-10 s at the high and 50% epiboly stages. Change of external medium composition had no effect on membrane permeability of intact embryos at early developmental stages. However, at later stages embryos spawned into 30% HBSS were less permeable than embryos spawned into system water, irrespective of calcium concentration. The flotation time of embryos at the high stage increased from 432+/-6s in system water to 468+/-10s in 30% HBSS. The study on dechorionated embryos showed that change of external medium composition had no effect on plasma membrane permeability.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Adams, S.L., Zhang, T. and Rawson, D.M.

Journal: Theriogenology

Volume: 64

Issue: 7

Pages: 1591-1602

ISSN: 0093-691X

DOI: 10.1016/j.theriogenology.2005.03.018

The effect of external medium composition on chorion and plasma membrane permeability of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos was investigated in this study. Initially, survival of embryos spawned into varying strengths (10-40%) of Hank's solution (HBSS) was assessed. Development and hatching rates for embryos spawned into 30% and 40% HBSS were significantly lower than those obtained with embryos spawned into system water. The effect of embryo survival in 30% HBSS with different calcium levels was then investigated. Embryo survival in calcium free 30% HBSS or 30% HBSS with 10× the standard calcium concentration was similar to survival in standard 30% HBSS. Membrane water permeability was determined by measuring the floatation time of embryos in test solutions made up with heavy water (D2O) instead of deionized water. Intact embryos at early developmental stages were less permeable than later stages irrespective of the external medium that they were spawned into. In system water, the floatation time of embryos at one-cell and two-cell stages were 1323 ± 83 and 1189 ± 55 s, respectively, compared to 432 ± 6 and 353 ± 10 s at the high and 50% epiboly stages. Change of external medium composition had no effect on membrane permeability of intact embryos at early developmental stages. However, at later stages embryos spawned into 30% HBSS were less permeable than embryos spawned into system water, irrespective of calcium concentration. The flotation time of embryos at the high stage increased from 432 ± 6 s in system water to 468 ± 10 s in 30% HBSS. The study on dechorionated embryos showed that change of external medium composition had no effect on plasma membrane permeability. © 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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